Nominations for the Beacon Awards 2015 are open - deadline extended to midday on Monday 8 December

The main award for 2015 is the Beacon Award for Philanthropy. In addition Beacon will also be presenting:
 
   •   Beacon Award for Outstanding Philanthropic Foundation
   •   Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropist and a Charity
   •   Beacon Award for City Philanthropy (sponsored by the City of London Corporation’s charity, City Bridge
       Trust through its project City Philanthropy – A Wealth of Opportunity)
   •   Beacon Award for Cultural Philanthropy
   •   Beacon Award for Impact Investment
 
Before preparing a nomination please thoroughly read this guidance document which contains all the information about eligibility, criteria, categories and FAQs.
 
When you are ready to submit a nomination please use this online form.
Beacon Awards

Philanthropy Footprints that Shape Society Today

To mark the launch of the 2015 awards, and to encourage nominations, Beacon is celebrating ten inspirational philanthropists from cities around the UK (many little known) to kick start debate about who has left a ‘philanthropy footprint’ that still affects society today and who is creating a ‘philanthropy footprint’ now.

Barney Hughes 1808-1878 (Belfast)

A business baker and pioneer impact investee who's bread alleviated hunger on an industrial scale.

Bernard Hughes, known as Barney, was born in Armagh. Having worked as a bakers’ boy for 6 years, in 1826 he moved to Belfast, and by 1870 he was recognised as the cities’ leading baker. As the owner of the largest baking enterprise in Ireland, his production supplied Belfast’s poorer population with much-needed cheap bread, particularly during the harsh years of the Great Famine. He gained the respect of the community as a municipal politician and industrial reformer, donating the ground for St Peter's Cathedral.

Current legacy: St Peter’s Cathedral is described today as ‘a landmark building’ in Belfast.

 

George Cadbury 1839 – 1922 (Birmingham)

The son of UK Chocolate and pioneer of responsible business practices

Everyone has heard of the Cadbury’s chocolate empire, but not many people know that the founder’s son, George Cadbury, was an important philanthropist in the 19th Century. George was driven by a passion for social reform, wanting to create clean and sanitary conditions for his workers in contrast to the usual grim reality of factories in Victorian Britain. He set new standards for living and working conditions and gave the Bourneville estate to the Bourneville Village Trust in 1901. The trust was founded to develop the local community and its surroundings.

Current legacy: The Bournville Village Trust is one of the largest and most respected housing trusts in the country specialising in development, communities, supported housing, special needs and urban regeneration.

 

Sir Montague Maurice Burton 1885 – 1952 (Leeds)

A clothing entrepreneur with an ethical edge 

A Lithuanian immigrant who arrived at the turn of the last century with just £100 to his name, Montague founded Burton, one of Britain's largest clothing shop chains. He started a tailoring business with the philanthropic aim of clothing the entire male population in good quality, affordable suits. Having enforced an unusually short working day for the time (8 hours) on his workforce, he was aware of the necessity to encourage wise and profitable use of spare time. He became one of the first to instil formal welfare provisions in the workplace, introducing food halls, leisure groups and activities such as theatre, dance and sports teams. He took an interest in maintaining the wellbeing of workers through health clinics and rest rooms. 

Current legacy:  Burton Clothing is still a successful British retailer. The company has worked closely with Cancer Research UK funding research into bowel cancer, and has supported the Movember Prostate Charity Campaign with the 'Burton' moustache, modeled on the moustache of their founder.

 

William Armstrong 1810 – 1900 (Newcastle)

A visionary engineer who saw that culture, history and identity matter

A visionary inventor, engineer, scientist and businessman, in his heyday William Armstrong employed over 25,000 people in the manufacture of hydraulic cranes, ships and armaments. Armstrong built Newcastle’s Swing Bridge and the hydraulic mechanism that operates London’s Tower Bridge. He also restored Bamburgh Castle on the Northumberland coast, often hailed as one of the most magnificent English castles to survive.  A prolific philanthropist, he founded Armstrong College (which evolved into Newcastle University), and gave funds to the Royal Victoria Infirmary as well as the Hancock Museum of Natural History (now the Great North Museum). 

Current legacy: Bamburgh castle described as 'the finest castle anywhere in this country' in Time Out Great Britain. The Great North museum has extensive collections and is a fantastic resource for teaching and research.

 

Edward Rushton 1756 – 1814 (Liverpool)

A poet who developed advocacy and campaigning as a tool for social change

A poet and slavery abolitionist, Edward Rushton was born in Liverpool in 1756. Whilst sailing with slave ships as a young man he became outraged at the appalling conditions he witnessed.  After an outbreak of the eye disease ophthalmia, Edward took food and water to the slaves which resulted in him losing his sight in his left eye and the damage of the right. As well as a career as an influential abolitionist, Rushton helped establish the Liverpool School for the Indigent Blind, the first of its kind in Britain, in 1791.

Current legacy: The Royal School for the Blind, Liverpool  is one of the leading schools of its kind today.

 

The Davies Sisters Gwendoline Davies (1882-1951) and Margaret Davies (1884-1963) (Cardiff)

Welsh sisters who pioneered music therapy and founded one of the UK's first music festivals

The Davies sisters, Gwendoline and Margaret, were two sisters from mid-Wales who will be remembered as dedicated patrons of the arts, bequeathing one of the great British art collections of the 20th century to the National Museum of Wales.  This is not all, however. Serving as Red Cross volunteers in World War One, Gwendoline and Margaret were so moved by the suffering they witnessed they resolved to establish an art and music centre for ex-soldiers. Gregynog Hall, the location of the centre, became the home to the annual Gregynog Music Festival, attracting musical luminaries such as Edward Elgar, Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst.

Current legacy: The National Museum of Wales  houses Wales’s national archaeology, art, geology and natural history collections as well as major touring and temporary exhibitions. Gregynog festival is still going today 

 

Dame Cecily Saunders 1918 – 2005 (Barnet)

A founder of the modern hospice who revolutionised care for the terminally ill

Dame Cicely Saunders founded the modern hospice and started a worldwide movement to provide compassionate care for the terminally ill. A nurse, social worker and doctor, she developed what is now called palliative care, and the modern hospice. In 1948 she met a patient, David Tasma, a Polish-Jewish refugee who, having escaped from the Warsaw ghetto, was dying of cancer. He bequeathed her £500. This donation helped germinate the idea which would become St Christopher's, founded in 1967 and the beginning of the hospice movement. In 2002, Saunders co-founded a new charity, Cicely Saunders International. 

Current legacy: Cicely Saunders International St Christopher’s Hospice and the National Council for Palliative Care 

 

Edward Alleyn 1566–1626 (London)

An infamous actor of Shakespeare's time who created opportunities for others

Born in Bishopsgate, London, Edward Alleyn became widely known as one of the most accomplished actors of Shakespeare’s time. During his theatrical career he was the most famous of players, but is now little remembered. In his later life Alleyn turned away from the stage and towards philanthropy, founding a school. Alleyn’s bequest established clear principles by which the school should be governed, with an important attribute of the school being its favouring of ‘poor scholars’, so that children could access education irrespective of wealth or social background. 3 foundation schools are still supported by his legacy: Alleyns, James Allen's Girl's School and Dulwich College

Current legacy: the schools are very successful with strong philanthropic traditions upheld today, for example Dulwich 

 

William Alison 1790 – 1859 (Edinburgh)

A doctor who wanted to cure the establishment of its cruel indifference to poverty

William Alison was an eminent Scottish physician who argued that poverty’s link to disease was to do with circumstance and not sin. The ethos of the age dictated that poverty was due to indolence, and treatment should be withheld for the ‘healthy impoverished’. A man who was ahead of his time, Alison campaigned for the government to take a more active role in alleviating poverty, with his proposal of the Scottish Poor Law and his 1840 treatise Observations on the management of the poor. He lived to see a noticeable shift towards his call for tolerance and compassion. 

Current legacy: a key campaigner in changing social attitudes and an early pioneer of what would become the Welfare State and NHS

 

John Rylands 1801 – 1888 (Manchester)

A businessman whose gave locally and was concerned globally

The first multi-millionaire from Manchester, John Rylands owned the largest textile business in the UK, combining his aptitude for business with a social conscience. In the Borough of Stretford, where he resided at Longford Hall, he made considerable philanthropic donations to the town which included the founding of orphanages, homes for the elderly and the donation of a Town Hall. His huge gifts of money to aid the poor of Italy earned him the "Crown of Italy" honour from the Italian king, and his sizeable private book collection constituted the basis of the John Rylands Library. The Library was founded by his wife Enriqueta Rylands, a strong yet modest Victorian woman and an eminent philanthropist in her own right, who left the Library in memory of her late husband as a philanthropic gift to the city of Manchester.

Current legacy: The John Rylands library forms part of the university of Manchester’s library. Longford Hall is a Grade 2 listed building 

 

Beacon Awards

Wendy Stephenson

Joint Award with John Pontin
 
Socially enlightened developer John Pontin OBE has created a literal ‘investment turbine’ that funds renewable sources of energy while generating financial returns to investors, provides a new form of economic power to India, and supports community projects in his home city of Bristol.
 
Pontin, who founded his multi-million pound business on fresh thinking, based the model on an original idea — that funding wind turbines in developing countries could generate additional benefits for communities at home and abroad.
 
John formed The Converging World charity in 2008, raising £1 million from his own resources and a similar amount from an Indian bank to fund two 1.5 megawatt turbines in an impoverished, rural area of Tamil Nadu. Power sold via the grid generates profit that funds local development work in India, environmental projects in the UK and reinvestment in more turbines.
 
With Wendy Stephenson as CEO, the charity raised money in 2012 for two further turbines, including nearly £200,000 from crowd funding. Investors receive 6% per annum return for a five-year loan.
 
The charity plans to build 200 megawatt of wind power over three to five years using debt and equity funding. The next tranche is for 25 megawatt turbines, which should generate £12 million for the charity over the 20-year life of the turbines.
 
Pontin and Stephenson are now building partnerships with like-minded charities and community foundations, sharing surplus from the turbines if these charities can help fund additional turbines.
Beacon Awards

John Pontin OBE

Joint Award with Wendy Stephenson
 
Socially enlightened developer John Pontin OBE has created a literal ‘investment turbine’ that funds renewable sources of energy while generating financial returns to investors, provides a new form of economic power to India, and supports community projects in his home city of Bristol.
 
Pontin, who founded his multi-million pound business on fresh thinking, based the model on an original idea — that funding wind turbines in developing countries could generate additional benefits for communities at home and abroad.
 
John formed The Converging World charity in 2008, raising £1 million from his own resources and a similar amount from an Indian bank to fund two 1.5 megawatt turbines in an impoverished, rural area of Tamil Nadu. Power sold via the grid generates profit that funds local development work in India, environmental projects in the UK and reinvestment in more turbines.
 
With Wendy Stephenson as CEO, the charity raised money in 2012 for two further turbines, including nearly £200,000 from crowd funding. Investors receive 6% per annum return for a five-year loan.
 
The charity plans to build 200 megawatt of wind power over three to five years using debt and equity funding. The next tranche is for 25 megawatt turbines, which should generate £12 million for the charity over the 20-year life of the turbines.
 
Pontin and Stephenson are now building partnerships with like-minded charities and community foundations, sharing surplus from the turbines if these charities can help fund additional turbines.
Beacon Awards

Michael McKibbin

Joint Award with Angila Chada
 
Michael McKibbin and Angila Chada share a common passion to see a stronger culture of philanthropy in Northern Ireland. They have become good friends through this ambition and through their willingness to act as ambassadors for the Community Foundation NI as fund holders, including attending events, meeting with prospective donors and making introductions. Crucially they have been willing to share their reasons for giving with the public through the press.
 
Their actions are not without risk.
 
One of the significant hurdles to developing local philanthropy, identified in a recent report, is the “cultural taboo against public philanthropy as it suggests ostentatious display of wealth. In Northern Ireland this is closely related to the history of the conflict and fearof ‘putting one’s head above the parapet’.”
 
In 2011, the Community Foundation NI hosted a ‘Philanthropy Week’ but found it difficult to persuade philanthropists to speak publicly. McKibbin however recognised the importance of doing so and also gave an interview to the Irish News about his family’s fund that supports children affected by illness or with special needs. His actions have inspired others to speak out about their own giving.
 
McKibbin’s fund, founded in memory of his parents in recognition of the positive upbringing they had provided, does not hold vast amounts of money, but allows the family to support four or five key projects each year, which he describes as “very rewarding, particularly when we see the results!”
 
Angila Chada, Chief Executive of Springboard, a young people’s peace-building charity in Belfast, also attended Philanthropy Week and was inspired to begin her own philanthropic journey. Chada was keen to illustrate that philanthropy isn’t exclusive to High Net Worth Individuals by setting up the Community Foundation’s first ever gradual growth endowment fund in January 2012 in honour of her parents who are able to share the joy of giving.
The Raj Darshna Foundation will support young people and the elderly in the community.
 
Chada describes its creation as the fulfilment of ‘a lifelong dream’. It became a reality after a visit to Auschwitz in 2009 when she was overwhelmed by a wish to give back. She feels she had an excellent upbringing and stable family home – but working in the community and voluntary sector, she knows that many local people have not been as fortunate.
 
As well as giving a portion of her wages each year she will be encouraging family and friends to invest for the benefit of others.
 
Chada has already given interviews to national and local press to explain why she feels it is important for others to consider how they could make a greater impact with their giving.
Beacon Awards

Angila Chada

Joint Award with Michael Mckibbin
 
Michael McKibbin and Angila Chada share a common passion to see a stronger culture of philanthropy in Northern Ireland. They have become good friends through this ambition and through their willingness to act as ambassadors for the Community Foundation NI as fund holders, including attending events, meeting with prospective donors and making introductions. Crucially they have been willing to share their reasons for giving with the public through the press.
 
Their actions are not without risk.
 
One of the significant hurdles to developing local philanthropy, identified in a recent report, is the “cultural taboo against public philanthropy as it suggests ostentatious display of wealth. In Northern Ireland this is closely related to the history of the conflict and fearof ‘putting one’s head above the parapet’.”
 
In 2011, the Community Foundation NI hosted a ‘Philanthropy Week’ but found it difficult to persuade philanthropists to speak publicly. McKibbin however recognised the importance of doing so and also gave an interview to the Irish News about his family’s fund that supports children affected by illness or with special needs. His actions have inspired others to speak out about their own giving.
McKibbin’s fund, founded in memory of his parents in recognition of the positive upbringing they had provided, does not hold vast amounts of money, but allows the family to support four or five key projects each year, which he describes as “very rewarding, particularly when we see the results!”
 
Angila Chada, Chief Executive of Springboard, a young people’s peace-building charity in Belfast, also attended Philanthropy Week and was inspired to begin her own philanthropic journey. Chada was keen to illustrate that philanthropy isn’t exclusive to High Net Worth Individuals by setting up the Community Foundation’s first ever gradual growth endowment fund in January 2012 in honour of her parents who are able to share the joy of giving.
The Raj Darshna Foundation will support young people and the elderly in the community.
 
Chada describes its creation as the fulfilment of ‘a lifelong dream’. It became a reality after a visit to Auschwitz in 2009 when she was overwhelmed by a wish to give back. She feels she had an excellent upbringing and stable family home – but working in the community and voluntary sector, she knows that many local people have not been as fortunate.
 
As well as giving a portion of her wages each year she will be encouraging family and friends to invest for the benefit of others.
 
Chada has already given interviews to national and local press to explain why she feels it is important for others to consider how they could make a greater impact with their giving.
Beacon Awards

John Stone

Building a philanthropic pipeline
 
Financier and philanthropist John Stone is quite clear - he does not give money away. The man who founded, built and sold wealth management company  Lombard International Assurance for a reputed £124m to Friends Provident in 2004 is one of a new breed of ‘philanthrocapitalists’ who take a strictly market-based approach to making a difference, investing funds in social businesses and charities with an entrepreneurial approach.
 
Stone says: “From day one we wanted to apply the same criteria to spending charitable funds as we would to any business project. We wanted to know how many people we could benefit, at what cost and how to achieve the best value. We wanted to be sure that the Foundation’s money would be put to the best possible use and have the biggest impact on those we chose to help. We wanted to build value.
 
“I have never set out to make money,” says Stone. “I have been fortunate to earn it because I have helped to create and develop successful businesses.  But investing in business and social impact enterprises are very similar; the keys to success are a great product or solution (preferably innovative) and a great management team to implement the business plan.”
 
When he established the Stone Family Foundation with an initial endowment of £50m in 2005, with his late wife Vanessa, he had not developed a giving strategy. “We had no clear passion for a cause. Our decision to give was because the money was there and we didn’t want to leave it all to the children so it was natural that we should start a charitable trust.”
 
Establishing a strategy
 
Like any shrewd businessman Stone took professional advice and encourages other would-be philanthropists to do the same. “The advice I have received from my bank’s philanthropy service and New Philanthropy Capital has been absolutely invaluable in terms of establishing the Foundation, helping us find the right path and making sure that we avoid the pitfalls that can trap the well-intentioned, unwary philanthropist.  And achieve the maximum possible impact from our grants.”
 
It led to the Foundation deciding to make grants to 10 projects in Sub Saharan Africa and South East Asia “where a pound can go much further than in the UK”, concentrating on water and sanitation, education for girls and micro-finance.
 
Today, The Stone Family Foundation is investing around £5m a year supporting innovative, sustainable and entrepreneurial approaches around the world, focussed primarily in the WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) Sector.  He is part of a small group of funders leading a surge in sanitation across the developing world, saving thousands of lives needlessly lost to avoidable illness such as diarrhoea and typhoid.
 
Projects such as iDE Cambodia’s Sanitation Marketing Scale Up project, co-funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, in which the Stone Family Foundation is investing £1.5m over three years, to build profitable enterprises and infrastructure that aims to enable 115,000 households in seven provinces of Cambodia to purchase affordable sanitary latrines.
 
Its sanitation marketing model, described as ‘sustainable business, development and dignity in one package’ increases household toilet ownership by facilitating sanitation sales networks that connect local businesses, communities and local government. Stone explains why selling not giving is important: “Giving these products away would undermine their value. By developing low cost, accessible products we enable ownership and a perceived value and that is a crucial part of the model.”
 
Data-driven evolution
 
Stone describes the Foundation’s journey as an “evolutionary process in which data and measurement have played a crucial part in growing confidence. We felt it was wise to proceed slowly and carefully and it took quite a while before we felt able to make significant grants in a focussed way. In doing so we believe we can achieve even greater impact than spreading small grants far and wide.”
 
The Stone Family Foundation (and Stone personally) have acquired a deep understanding of WASH issues and is now taking the lead – and risk - on innovation in this area. In February 2012 it set up Stone Prize for ‘Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Water’, providing risk capital for innovative, entrepreneurial, scalable projects in water aid. In November 2012 the first prize was awarded to Dispensers for Safe Water (DSW) in Kenya that provides free access to chlorine at communal water points. It has already reached approximately 424,000 people in more than 800 villages. The prize will support DSW’s efforts to produce and deploy 3,000 new chlorine dispensers, enough to provide safe drinking water to over 600,000 people. “It was the unique approach and scale that made this project stand out, as well as the dynamic team behind it,” says Stone.
 
Stone's philanthropic work, to which he commits the equivalent of one day a week, is now, he says, "more satisfying and more fun for me than business. It also allows me to add more value. I really feel I'm using my money, my time and my talents well. I've become an evangelist."
 
Stone regularly visits the 15 or so non governmental organisations (NGOs) the Foundation supports, in some cases acting as an informal non-executive director providing them with business advice and direction. “Our hands-on support is as valuable as the grants we make and I would encourage others to use their time and expertise as well as their money in support of their projects.”
 
What giving gives back
 
Marketing to the ‘bottom of the pyramid’ has been “an interesting experience full of insights,” says Stone, who spends most of his week servicing the pinnacle of that pyramid as chairman of Blevins Franks Financial Management Limited.
 
“I consider myself as an experienced marketing man but I have been surprised by what I have learned; what motivates villagers to buy latrines for instance. While we educate about the health benefits of good sanitation, it is often status and a sense of ‘keeping up with the Jones’ that is the real motivator – that and wanting to avoid snake bites! I have certainly learned things about marketing that I have brought into my own business,” he says.
 
Philanthropy is a two-way street and Stone like many philanthropist talks of the “joy and meaning” it has given him. For all the focus on bottom lines, data and other business realities, the real achievement says Stone is the “smiles of villagers whose children are healthy and thriving. And the greatest satisfaction he says “has come from providing the ‘seed capital’ for projects which have become self-sustaining; so they can say to me ‘we do not need any further funds from you.  We are on our own now’.”
 
More recently Stone’s children and step-children have become involved in the Foundation.  Apart from acting as trustees they have been encouraged to develop their own interests.  As a result, the Foundation is now making grants to UK organisations tackling social problems; in particular disadvantaged youths and mental health. “I hope our Foundation proves to be an influential catalyst to encourage philanthropists to invest on a large scale in social enterprises to eradicate the terrible consequences for the millions of people who do not have access to safe drinking water and/or adequate sanitation.”

“Philanthropy takes you off the beaten track,” says Stone, referring to the trips to Mozambique, Cambodia and other far flung spots, but it never takes him too far from his business head and heart. 
Beacon Awards

Marcelle Speller

Marcelle Speller OBE, who co-founded, built and sold the hugely successful Holiday-Rentals.com business, applied her know-how to pioneer a digital platform that helps build communities by enabling the smallest local community groups and charities to raise money, awareness and support online.
 
Working together with UK Community Foundations and other partners, Speller has committed four years and £2.5 million of her personal wealth to develop Localgiving.com. Inspired by the service that small, unregistered groups provide to their communities, Speller’s dotcom brainchild has given them access to new donors and new ways to increase awareness and raise funds. This includes social media and online matching using grants from the government’s Office for Civil Society and other private philanthropists. The site also automatically processes Gift Aid, even for charities too small to be registered.
 
The site is democratising giving by allowing people to donate with confidence directly to local small charities and community groups — all of which have been validated by Localgiving.com, or their local Community Foundation. In 2012 over £3 million in donations, Gift Aid and match funding was channelled to the 3,000+ local charities and community groups already registered on the site.
 
Speller had a vision of technology enabling local and unregistered charities at a time when funding cuts threatened their very existence, and it is her creativity, drive and energy, as well as her financial backing, that has made it a reality.
Beacon Awards

J.K Rowling

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling uses both fame and fortune in her philanthropy, choosing challenging, and often neglected, causes that will benefit most from the enhanced media profile her support brings. In this way Rowling maximises her social capital and celebrity status for the benefit of the most vulnerable and excluded in society.
 
Fame brought with it many media clichés, turning Rowling into ‘Britain’s most famous single mother’: unable to break free of the crass labelling Rowling put it to use by becoming Ambassador and then President of the National Council for One-Parent Families, now called Gingerbread.
 
In 2000 she established The Volant Charitable Trust that uses its annual budget to combat poverty and social inequality, with a particular emphasis on women and children. Volant also funds major disaster appeals as the focus of the Trust’s international support.
 
Rowling supported the Multiple Sclerosis Society Scotland for many years. As well as donating money, she hosted events, lobbied politicians, wrote articles and gave interviews to raise awareness of the disease. In 2010 Rowling made a substantial donation to found The Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic at Edinburgh University in memory of her mother who suffered with Multiple Sclerosis. It will carry out major research into MS and other degenerative neurological conditions.
 
Rowling’s philanthropy is now highly visible and involved. In December 2008, her book, The Tales of Beedle the Bard, was published, raising millions for The Children’s High Level Group, now Lumos, Rowling’s charity working to transform the lives of disadvantaged children. The two books she wrote for Comic Relief — Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Quidditch Through the Ages — have gone on to raise £15.7 million for the fund.
Beacon Awards

Kavita Oberoi

Kavita Oberoi’s philanthropy is a product of her upbringing. Inspired to give by her father, a successful and charitable businessman, Oberoi chooses to support causes that reflect her own cultural struggles, encountered as the daughter of a traditional Indian family raised in the North.
 
Oberoi was the first woman in her family to gain a university degree and be allowed to work, for which she credits her mother. It has led to Oberoi’s deep commitment to empowering women and encouraging their success.
 
After achieving her own business success and since appearing on Channel 4’s Secret Millionaire, Oberoi has become involved with many charities, donating £100,000 of personal wealth and much energy to them.
In 2010 WAGGGS (World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts) appointed Oberoi as Chair of the Global Girls’ Fund Board. Giving both time and funds, she is leading the drive to raise £10m by June 2014 to develop programmes and opportunities to enable each girl to reach their fullest potential.
 
Oberoi is the first ever Patron of the Body Charity, which helps individuals with serious body image issues, is Patron of Derby Women’s Centre and Burton & South Derbyshire College, and Ambassador of Local Giving in Derby, which uses a web platform to support small local charities.
 
Oberoi has now turned her attentions to encouraging philanthropy within BME communities and in 2012 chaired the Diversity Action Group as part of the Government’s Giving Summit.
Beacon Awards

Nick O’Donohoe

Nick O’Donohoe has been a driving force behind the development of the global impact investment market. He has volunteered his skills and knowledge and taken leadership roles in strategic organisations providing the vital infrastructure that will allow the industry to reach its huge potential.
 
In 2007, while Global Head of Research at J.P. Morgan Investment Bank, O’Donohoe was instrumental in creating its Social Finance Unit to provide capital and financial advice to the emerging impact investing market. In 2010 he led the team responsible for the J.P. Morgan/Rockefeller Foundation research publication “Impact Investments — An emerging asset class” — a report which stimulated significant growth in impact investment globally.
 
In 2011 he was appointed CEO of Big Society Capital, the world’s first social investment bank, created by the UK Government with £600 million of capital and a mandate to grow the UK social Investment market. O’Donohoe now sits on the Board of the Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN), is a member of the Advisory Board of Bridges Ventures, and Vice Chairman of the World Economic Forum’s Social Innovation Council.
 
Impact investing offers access to new funds via the capital markets through blended investment vehicles. The Boston Consulting Group estimates the UK market could reach £1billion by 2016. O’Donohoe has been hugely influential in raising public awareness and confidence in the sector. He has been behind the development of impact investing as a recognised asset class, promoting education, capital markets methodologies, research and now directing investment capital into the sector.
Beacon Awards

Michael Norton OBE

Michael Norton OBE started his career as a scientist, merchant banker and publisher before becoming a social activist.
 
He has spent more than 40 years supporting voluntary organisations, developing creative ideas for a better world, turning them into successful projects and encouraging others to go out and change the world.
 
Norton has founded more than 40 charitable organisations since 1966, when he created the first language education programme for non-English speaking immigrant children and their families, run entirely by volunteers.
 
In 1975 he set up the Directory of Social Change, now a leading provider of training and support to the non-profit sector. He established the Centre for Innovation in Voluntary Action (CIVA) in 1995, which has initiated a raft of projects worldwide, including: a banking system for street children in South Asia; village publishing and libraries in India; UnLtd, a foundation which makes awards to UK social entrepreneurs and is now spreading internationally; Youthbank, which engages young people as donors; and MyBnk, which encourages UK schoolchildren to set up and run microbanks to improve financial literacy. Norton’s most recent projects are www.buzzbnk.org — a ‘crowd-funding’ website for social ventures —and the International Centre for Social Franchising to help great ideas spread.
 
Norton’s legacy to the voluntary sector is legion, his CV a testament to creativity and collaboration. He has shared his knowledge and experience in several books, including Writing Better Fundraising Applications and 365 Ways to Change the World.
Beacon Awards

Gordon Morrison

Gordon Morrison is a successful entrepreneur whose innovative spirit has transformed two childhood cancer charities. His approach to philanthropy is to achieve measurable impact, and is governed by his personal motto:
“If you can, you should”.
 
As Chairman of Sargent Cancer Care for Children he presided over the merger of Sargent and CLIC in 2004 to create the largest child cancer charity in the UK.
 
Following a 2006 visit to Bangladesh, Morrison discovered that 80% of child cancer cases occurred in developing countries but only 10% survive despite affordable treatments being available. Morrison resolved to focus on this neglected area of international child healthcare and co-founded World Child Cancer in 2007, a charity which improves diagnosis, treatment and care for children with cancer in low/middle income countries.
 
Morrison has led the creation of eight ‘twinning’ projects between healthcare professionals in developed and developing countries, tangibly improving cancer survival rates and palliative care provision for some of the world’s poorest children. In 2012 the charity has helped 5,000 children and provided training for 1,000 healthcare professionals.
 
Morrison’s personal financial support has leveraged donations from others and provided valuable funding in the charity’s early days. He is personally involved in fundraising activities, raising £70,000 in 2011 when he took part in the Royal Parks Half Marathon.
 
Morrison’s leadership and personal engagement have had a compelling impact on both UK and international child cancer charitable sectors.
Beacon Awards

Jack Morris

Jack Morris is Chairman of the Business Design Centre Group; not surprising then the £3 million Islington Giving campaign he champions and supports is neatly designed so that its challenge is an integral part of its solution.
 
The extreme deprivation and extreme wealth that sit cheek by jowl in Islington are seen as a ‘geographic advantage’ by Islington Giving,which aims to engage the community in tackling the stubborn poverty that prevails.
Islington Giving is an innovative partnership between funders, local businesses and residents who give time and money to support the borough’s poorest residents. Since its launch in September 2010 it has raised over £1.8
million and supports more than 30 projects for youngand old.
 
As Chair of the Appeal Committee, Morris freely gives his time to involve residents and businesses. As a result, the ‘BIG (Businesses for Islington Giving) Alliance’ was launched in September 2012 to develop the City’s corporate philanthropy in Islington. Chaired by Macquarie Group, its membership includes the Corporation of London, and companies such as Argent, Mitsubishi and Slaughter and May.
 
Morris, who also chairs the Morris Charitable Trust, hosts events, leads walking tours of Islington, visits projects, and acts as an advocate for the campaign with Government ministers and local politicians.
 
The Beacon Judges were particularly impressed by the replicability and scalability of this grassroots model that is proving inspirational and was featured in the government’s White Paper on Giving.
Beacon Awards

Harvey McGrath

Philanthropy on a grander scale
 
Measurement, impact and scale underpin the philanthropy of Belfast-born international financier Harvey McGrath, whose gentle manner belies the meteoric career that has taken him from London to New York and back again in leading roles with Chase Manhattan Bank, Man Group and Prudential.
 
“Helping charities and third sector organisations do what they do better and do it on a grander scale,” is how McGrath describes his charitable work. This ambition that has led the winner of the 2013 City Philanthropy Beacon Award to use his money, time, business acumen and voice to build capacity within the sector, and help it understand and leverage its own success.
 
“It is an important and interesting way to support charities and social enterprises,” he says.
 
This ‘macro-philanthropic’ approach that concerns itself with performance, structure, behaviour, and decision-making has seen McGrath take up trusteeships and chairmanships in many strategic organisations, such as the East London Business Alliance, the London Development Agency, Heart of the City and London Enterprise Partnership (LEP) as well as a number of charities, working ‘upstream’ and often against the tide to bring about cultural change or pioneer new methods to address social need.
 
“It was through wearing my business hat that I became interested in supporting interventions that work, whether they be government or third sector organisations or a combination of both.”
 
Funding for impact
 
McGrath was an initial funder and trustee of New Philanthropy Capital (NPC), that delivers research-based efforts to charities and funders that seek to measure impact and effectiveness. “It sounds trite but the sector needs to know the difference it makes and how to measure that. Measurement means organisations can more easily access funding by being able to articulate the impact and difference they make.”
 
McGrath is pleased with the progress that has been made on the impact agenda: “Certainly in the last 5 years NPC has had a significant influence on the way people view charity, and their work has informed government, donors and perhaps most importantly charities themselves.”
 
Transformation is a recurring theme for McGrath and particularly that achieved through education, which is born of his own experience; McGrath secured a place at Cambridge, after being encouraged to apply by an inspirational teacher. “I had the benefit of a good education and that was very important to me. Quite a bit of what I do is about access to a good quality education.”
 
Since 2009, he has chaired the education charity The Prince's Teaching Institute (PTI) and been its principal donor, funding its programme that champions excellence and passion in subject based teaching.
 
The value of voice
 
McGrath also funds the widening participation department of his alma mater Cambridge University: ‘ I want to help to widen access to this special place to enable talented individuals from all backgrounds to share the Cambridge experience, and to help offset what I perceive as a dilution of the social diversity that I valued so much in my time here’ . His support includes funding summer residential schemes for school students and a range of other initiatives: “I have encouraged them to be a bit more radical about that by reaching down into the schools themselves.”
 
The softly-spoken Belfast man is not averse to using his voice on issues about which he feels passionate. “Not that we have a monopoly on wisdom, but simply put, what we are doing is trying to change the world and make it better and if we have an informed point of view and know there is a proven better way we have a responsibility to express an opinion.”
 
McGrath is currently involved in a multi-layered advocacy campaign to convince Northern Ireland’s government of the benefits of Integrated Education in developing ‘a civil society in a divided community’.
 
“Just the mere fact of growing up together in the same school engenders a much more balanced worldview and greater understanding among children and parents.” Parents must petition for integrated schools and governments will only take on those that have proved viable, so McGrath has provided start-up capital for several, alongside support for both a grassroots and policy level campaign in a bid to take integrated education mainstream.
 
“Progress is slow but there is traction. Only 8% of school age children are in integrated education but the situation is moving forward and both main parties, Sinn Fein and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), who were indifferent or worse, are now engaging with the issue , and the First Minister Peter Robinson sees it as a key plank in creating a civil society.”
 
McGrath says advocacy, particularly in this arena, “is not always safe but the reality is that in many countries and in the UK, with many social issues and areas of need, the big elephant in the room is government and therefore influencing policy makers in government can be critically important”.
 
Having applied his resources to social need for more than 15 years, McGrath’s biggest learning he says is that “this stuff is not easy”.
 
“In a business world the measure of success is pretty straightforward. Measuring effectiveness and success and managing culture change within the third sector is more difficult.”
 
He says, and shows, the way to do it is to provide financial and non-financial support, helping impactful organisations to grow. “Sometimes a cheque is the most important thing, particularly if a charity has lost its funding stream, say as a result of government cuts. Then it is important to step in while they stabilise their finances. But just as important are the business skills, advice and insights one can provide.”
 
Rewards and returns
 
McGrath says developing charitable organisations and social enterprise solutions is “at least as rewarding as building a good business and probably more so. If you run a good business you help people stretch just as a good teacher helps youngsters mature and develop. There is something particularly rewarding and special about helping those who have real need.”
 
When drawn on the achievements of which he is particularly proud, McGrath hesitates for a moment: “it is invidious to choose” but names two charitable projects: Icould (www.icould.com), a careers advice and inspiration website which centres on the simple idea of people telling their warts-and-all career stories, that McGrath funds and chairs. “It now receives 100,000 hits a month and I am proud of what they have managed to achieve with limited resources.”
 
And on a completely different scale – quite literally – he highlights the ‘The Piano Man’ – Richard Merrick. McGrath tells the story: “Richard grew up somewhere west of Oxford. He was a very talented pianist but was not in a school or place where anyone recognised that talent till quite late – but nevertheless he did become a concert pianist. However he developed cancer and therefore couldn’t maintain the required practice so he taught. He opened a studio in the City, teaching lawyers and bankers and the like to play. But Richard had a desire to go back to state schools and find children who were talented and give them the coaching they needed to help them achieve their dreams. Piano ‘Man’ – because the Man Group was funding him– ran master classes, pulling in young pianists to whom we would offer scholarships. Many went on to Oxbridge and beyond.”
 
When McGrath retired from Man Group in 2007 and some years later they decided not to continue funding Richard, McGrath stepped in; the developmental nature of Piano Man’s work - finding and developing young talented pianists - clearly striking a chord with McGrath.
 
It’s the taking part that counts
 
McGrath is one of those philanthropists who puts the ‘do’ in ‘donor’ – he has no desire to set up a foundation. “Any surplus will be given in my lifetime. There is nothing wrong in leaving a legacy but I am more interested in the whole process of giving and being engaged with it.”
 
And he encourages others to do the same, highlighting of course the developmental benefits it brings. His advice for others, when asked, is: “Get involved. Anything you can do is great, both time and energy, as well as money; it is rewarding and helps develop an understanding of the world and opens up interesting networks.”
 
Bio
 
Harvey McGrath was Chairman of Prudential from January 2009-July 2012. He has a long and distinguished career in the international financial services industry, starting at Chase Manhattan Bank in London and New York. From 1980 to 2007 he worked for the Man Group, first as Treasurer, then Finance Director, then President of Man Inc. in New York before being appointed as Chief Executive of Man Group plc in London in 1990 and then Chairman in 2000. He retired from Man Group in 2007. He is the former Chairman of the London Development Agency, London First and the East London Business Alliance, and former Vice Chairman of the London Skills and Employment Board (2006-2011). In 2011, Harvey was appointed as Co-Chair of the new Board of the London Enterprise Partnership (LEP). Harvey is Chairman of Governors of Birkbeck College, Chairman of Heart of the City, The Prince’s Teaching Institute, and Icould and Trustee of a number of other charities. These include New Philanthropy Capital; the Royal Anniversary Trust which operates the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes for Higher and Further Education; and Children and Families Across Borders (CFAB). He also serves on the Advisory Boards of the Sutton Trust and the Centre for Social Justice.
Beacon Awards

Paul Marshall

Paul Marshall, co-founder of one of the City’s leading hedge funds, is a radical educational reformer who has founded and supported a number of pioneering organisations to raise standards, spread excellence and create opportunities for children in disadvantaged communities.
 
Co-founder and trustee of global children’s charity ARK (Absolute Return for Kids) and Chairman of ARK Schools, established in 2004, Marshall is a driving force behind the focus on tackling economic and social disadvantage through quality education.
 
ARK now runs 18 academies, funded through a mix of City money and public money, with plans to rise to 50 academies in the next five years. It is one of England’s best performing academy networks, doubling and even trebling GCSE success rates in some schools.
 
ARK Schools have been the seedbed for many innovative initiatives, including The Future Leaders and Teaching Leaders programmes that train leaders for inner city schools. These are now national programmes which are having a demonstrable impact on student attainment in the 200 challenging schools in which they operate.
 
In India, ARK has pioneered the rollout of voucher schemes to enable the poorest children to access low cost private schools. In Uganda, 21,500 children will be educated at 10 new ARK-supported secondary schools over 10 years.
 
Marshall is also Chairman of the Management Committee of the independent think tank, Centreforum, which was relaunched with his support in 2006.
Beacon Awards

Nick Ferguson CBE & Jane Ferguson

Nick and Jane Ferguson set their principal strategy to support families, young people and the elderly in Kintyre, Mid Argyll and the Cowal Peninsula in Argyll & Bute.
 
The Fergusons’ philanthropy, driven by a passion for the area, is deeply-committed and highly-informed. It is based on research they specially commission to ensure their funding is targeted at meeting genuine and greatest need.
 
Their philanthropy programme, The Kilfinan Trust, has invested £450,00 since 2006, providing long-term funding to local organisations working to tackle issues particular to this rural and isolated region, with its declining, yet increasingly elderly, population. It is an area with limited employment opportunities for young people. The Kilfinan Trust has supported the development and extension of projects providing employment skills to young people, scholarships for Argyll students to attend University, befriending services for the elderly, support for families and their children, and early intervention work.
 
The Fergusons have provided more than money, giving guidance, where relevant. They typically visit projects annually, participating in reviews to ensure that organisations operate efficiently and funds continue to be targeted in the best way.
 
The Fergusons have inspired others to follow their approach, holding ‘influencers dinners’ and participating in a promotional event to Scots in London at the House of Lords, attracting further philanthropic investment into Argyll & Bute.
 
Nick was awarded the CBE in the 2013 New Year Honours List for services to Philanthropy and Higher Education.
Beacon Awards

Sir Thomas Hughes-Hallett

Active, authoritative and ambassadorial, Sir Tom Hughes-Hallett is a philanthropy champion whose influence has been felt right across the philanthropy spectrum, from grassroots to policy level.
 
Following a 25-year City career in investment banking, he has dedicated the last 12 years to promoting and improving philanthropy in the UK.
 
Sir Tom’s passion for and commitment to the voluntary sector is evidenced by the myriad public service roles he has held since 2000. They include Chief Executive of Marie Curie Cancer Care until 2012,
for which he received a knighthood; Chair of the independent 2010 Philanthropy Review, tasked with achieving a step-change in UK charitable giving; Trustee of The Kings Fund, and now Chair and Adjunct Professor of the Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London. Sir Tom has shown peers how and why getting involved with charities can be rewarding.
 
His personal giving has been passionately directed through his family trust — the Emily Hughes-Hallett Trust. He also believes in local grassroots giving and has a family fund administered by The Suffolk Community Foundation.
 
Sir Tom has demonstrated passion, knowledge, pragmatism and common sense and in so doing earned respect and admiration.
 
He has led by example and uses his influence to push the boundaries of philanthropy in all its forms. To that end, he was influential with others in successfully challenging the Government’s proposal on capping tax benefits related to charitable giving during 2012.
Beacon Awards

Sir Vernon Ellis

Luck and fortune – a philanthropist’s tale
 
Twists of fate, circumstance and ‘being in the right place at the right time’ have taken Sir Vernon Ellis from hesitant donor to prize-winning cultural philanthropist and impresario over 20 years.
 
Sir Vernon, who this year was awarded a Beacon prize for his contribution to the arts, is wholly committed to sustaining the vitality of the UK cultural sector, investing time, money and even opening his home in support of opera and new musical talent.  
 
But he recalls a halting start to what is now a fulsome and literal philanthropic ‘career’ – Sir Vernon currently spends three days of his week in a ‘labour of love’ doing what he calls “the heavy lifting and a lot of travelling” as unpaid Chair of the UK’s international relations organisation The British Council.
 
“In the 90s when I was earning quite a lot of money as a senior partner at Accenture, giving away £1000 seemed an enormous amount of money. It just wasn’t a natural thing to do.”
 
Music joined the dots
 
It was Sir Vernon’s life-long love of music that helped him scale that particular hurdle as it led to him becoming closer to several musical organisations and chairing the boards of them. “It led to my giving to the causes and institutions I was close to and love, in a responsive and ad hoc way. And if you give like that you get involved in a virtuous circle in that the more you give, the more you get involved and the more interested you become, so the more you get used to it.
 
“You realise that giving away £1,000, £2,000, even £10,000 isn’t really too much of a problem and also realise you don’t fall by the wayside if you do.”
 
In 2001 there was “a significant switch” in his giving habits and philanthropic reach as a result of a particular series of events. Having chaired a small opera company and being involved in the ENO’s advisory board for contemporary opera and outreach programme, Sir Vernon was asked to sit on the main board of trustees.  “This was a fairly major step-up in my voluntary activities.”
 
Stepping up
 
Soon after, the ENO launched a major restoration appeal. Around £6m had been raised privately but they needed quickly to get to £11m in order to trigger public funds.
 
“Having received shares from the IPO of Accenture I committed £5m to bridge this gap. It wasn’t a calculated gift.  In fact it was very rash and I just occasionally realise the shares would now be worth four times that amount now. But there is no point worrying about that,” says Sir Vernon, musing on his rush to the breach, which led to the raising of the full £18m and the restoration of the Frank Matcham theatre to its Edwardian glory to become once again ‘the people’s palace of entertainment’.
 
“In another twist of fate, because the Accenture shares could not all be sold straightaway, I created a foundation which could act as a lock-up and subsequently be used as a pass-through. In a way this forced a step-up in my philosophy and approach to giving.”
 
Philanthropy comes home
 
Another life event in 2004/05 pushed philanthropy into yet another area of Sir Vernon’s life – his home. “It began a synergy in the way my life works.”  The acquisition of a new London apartment with an expansive drawing room lent itself to intimate concerts - 90 in the last year alone – which have over the years raised more than £300,000 in support of young and new performers and provided showcase and rehearsal opportunities for them.
 
“It is another way of getting closer to the organisations and individuals I support. Over time the interaction through giving to musical groups and getting to know them enables you to see at first hand the difference you are making.”
 
The joy of giving
 
Sir Vernon is clear about the rewards of philanthropy and is happy to acknowledge them. “I think we shouldn’t rely just on pure altruism or a pure sense of owing or needing to ‘give back’. Rather it is about joy. And as you get older you realise the joy you get in using your money in these areas is greater than the joy you get spending your money on luxuries. It’s more fun, more satisfying, more valuable to do so. There is a psychic return.”
Sir Vernon’s car is a ‘marque’ of this philosophy. “Each time I have replaced it I have chosen to downgrade. It just doesn’t seem that important to have a luxury car.”
 
In reflecting on how more people could be encouraged to give, a topic he became publicly involved with as part of the 2010 independent Philanthropy Review, he says: “I genuinely think most people in the wealthy category could significantly up their giving and not be noticeably worse off. A great challenge is to engage with those people and get them to see that not only is it almost an obligation to use your wealth to help others who need it but it is interesting and fulfilling.”
 
Charities also have a part to play he says. “While there is much more engagement between charities and donors today, one still finds charities who take their donors for granted. We don’t do it to get buckets of adulations we really don’t – a simple thank-you is enough. But there is a sense of being taken for granted if one is not thanked.”
 
A lifetime’s legacy
 
Sir Vernon’s giving has bled into every aspect of his life – even the gardens he is establishing at his country property in West Sussex are open to the public several times a year.
 
He is one of the UK’s leading supporters of the arts, with gifts now totalling more than £7m to around 70 arts organisations, nearly all musical, in recent years. He is very much part of the ‘giving while living’ cadre and has no desire to leave a huge estate or indeed to will fortunes to his children.  “Some have a strong desire to leave money to their children. I don’t and they know that and agree. I don’t think it does a lot of good to leave a large bequest.”
 
Sir Vernon’s philanthropic legacy is his contribution to music for which he was honoured in the 2011 New Year’s Honours. He owes it he says to “being in the right place at the right time, for which I feel very lucky.”
Beacon Awards

Lloyd Dorfman CBE

Founder and Chairman of Travelex plc, Lloyd Dorfman has given unparalleled support to the National Theatre (NT) as a theatre enthusiast, corporate partner, board member and its largest donor.
 
The mutually fruitful relationship began in 2003 when Dorfman backed the ‘Travelex £10 Season’ offering subsidised tickets, which continues today. More than 1.2 million Travelex Season tickets have been sold since its launch. Each year an average of 28% of these tickets are purchased by first-time visitors, proof of the campaign’s success in attracting new and diverse audiences. It has become a blueprint for the power of private philanthropy and sponsorship of the arts.
 
In 2007, Dorfman joined the NT Board and plays a highly active role, bringing to bear his entrepreneurial knowledge and passion for theatre.
 
Dorfman has made a number of significant personal donations over the years. In October 2011, the Dorfman family foundation made a £10 million pledge in support of the ‘NT Future’ capital campaign, to create a world-class facility for theatre artists and audiences. In recognition of this ‘transformational’ gift — the largest in NT history — the Cottesloe Theatre will re-open as the Dorfman Theatre. Thirty thousand more people each year will be able to see shows in the newly-named Dorfman Theatre.
 
At a difficult time for arts funding, Dorfman is a prime example of how inspiring private philanthropy can make a measurable difference to the cultural life of the UK.
Beacon Awards

Stephen Dawson OBE

When 10 years ago venture capitalist Stephen Dawson co-founded Impetus Trust to act as a “magnifying glass, focussing resources onto a charitable organisation for a finite period of time”, his long-term vision for this new ‘venture philanthropy’ model was “to drive change not only within the charity, but to inspire change across an entire sector or system”.
 
Venture philanthropy aims to accelerate the growth of selected charities and social enterprises by offering management support, specialist expertise and financial resources, for social, rather than financial, return.
Impetus Trust’s 10-year Impact Report, published in December 2012, confirms Dawson’s first ambitions for venture philanthropy are well on the way to being realised.
 
The report shows Impetus Trust’s portfolio of 16 charities and social enterprises that work to alleviate poverty has helped over 485,000 economically disadvantaged people to access education, skills and jobs. On average, the investee organisations have increased the number of people they help by 39% per annum and in 2011/12 they received more than £5 million worth of pro bono support and grants through Impetus. For every £1 Impetus invests it is able to leverage nearly £4 more.
 
The broader impact of Dawson’s pioneering approach however is that ‘venture philanthropy’ is now recognised and well-established, reportedly worth more than 1.5 billion Euros, and a European Association dedicated to the promotion of venture philanthropy is flourishing.
 
Dawson has since co-founded Jacana Venture Partnership, a pan-African private equity company that invests in entrepreneurial SMEs for blended return.
Beacon Awards

Carol Colburn Grigor CBE

American-born former concert pianist Carol Colburn Grigor has been described as one of the most ‘significant, prolific, and dedicated’ philanthropists in the UK.
 
Her deep passion for the arts could be said to be in her genes; her music-loving businessman father, Richard D. Colburn, donated generously and strategically, though quietly, to classical music, particularly in Los Angeles.
 
Through the family-founded Dunard Fund, Grigor has provided tens of millions of pounds for a wide range of arts organisations including the Edinburgh International Festival, the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Monteverdi Choir, Scottish Opera, Dunedin Consort, and the National Galleries of Scotland.
 
In particular her commitment to the work of the Edinburgh International Festival (EIF) represents the most significant contribution of private support received from one source in its 65-year history; over £8m has been given in the last 15 years alone.
 
Grigor is a tireless critic of poor management in arts organisations and champions the creation of sustainable entities through the provision of multi-year financial support and advice on programming.
Such is the respect for her knowledge and ability in philanthropy, and in music and the arts, that Grigor’s support serves as a seal of approval for a recipient organisation, attracting other philanthropists to make further investments.
 
Grigor’s whole life is oriented around music philanthropy, and without it the UK’s cultural sector would be considerably poorer and less innovative.
Beacon Awards

Sir Ronald Cohen

Sir Ronald Cohen has made a truly outstanding contribution to the emergence of the impact investment sector worldwide.
 
The co-founder and former Chairman of private equity firm Apax Partners has dedicated much of the last decade to his vision that entrepreneurship and market forces can be harnessed to address societal challenges more effectively and to support sustainable growth.
 
In 2000, Sir Ronald chaired the UK’s Social Investment Task Force (SIFT), whose recommendations to Government resulted in crucial milestones such as the creation of the Community Development Finance Association, the launch of Bridges Ventures, and the acceptance of mission-related investments as a viable approach for achieving the objects of charitable foundations.
 
In 2005 Sir Ronald chaired the Commission on Unclaimed Assets, which recommended the use of unclaimed assets to fund a social investment bank whose creation was recommended by the Social Investment Taskforce.
Since then, Sir Ronald has co-founded a number of other important impact investment organisations, including Social Finance UK, which pioneered social impact bonds; Social Finance USA and Big Society Capital, the world’s first social investment bank, which has been funded through £400 million of unclaimed assets and £200 million investment by Britain’s leading banks.
 
Having become increasingly involved in promoting peace in the Middle East by economic means, Sir Ronald co-founded The Portland Trust in 2003 to help develop the Palestinian private sector and to relieve poverty through social entrepreneurship in Israel, as drivers of moderation and peace in the region.
Beacon Awards

Richard Bradbury, CBE

Former Chief Executive of River Island Richard Bradbury is pioneering in his philanthropy on two levels: firstly for the cause he has chosen to support and secondly for the innovative package he created to fund it.
 
In 2011, Scope (a charity focused on serving disabled individuals and their families) sought £1 million to build a unique supported living service for five young disabled people, all of whom faced an uncertain future. Owing to a severe lack of suitable independent living accommodation, around 95% of disabled young adults with complex needs are offered inappropriate placements, some even in nursing homes for older people or hospices, where physical needs take priority over education, training and independence.
 
Bradbury worked with Scope to develop a layered financing structure to raise the capital for the building project. Bradbury made a generous gross donation of £400,000 with an innovative £200,000 interest-free loan over a 10-year period. Thanks to Bradbury’s support and advice, Scope was able to take out a £200,000 mortgage, leaving only £200,000 to raise in donations from other sources.
 
Thanks to Bradbury’s pioneering approach, Scope was able to secure all the funding to proceed within a six-month period. The new ‘Ashurst’ service, the first of its kind in the UK, opened in September 2012. Residents are now able to fulfil their own ambitions and be self-determined.
 
Bradbury’s pioneering creative philanthropy is an inspiration to philanthropists to use their resources to create greater leverage.
Beacon Awards

Harris Bokhari

In a dismal climate for charitable fundraising, Harris Bokhari is living proof that with the right strategies, professionalism and an understanding of what donors need, it is possible to achieve outstanding fundraising success.Bokhari has raised more than £750,000 in the last 12 months for various charities, totally voluntarily.
 
He helped to establish the Better Community Business Network that brings together local groups of Asian business people to network for business while raising funds for their neighbourhood charities. At its inaugural fundraising event it raised £209,000 in one night. A year later the event raised a further £173,000, despite the challenging economic climate.
 
Bokhari has raised significant funds by connecting minority community organisations with fundraisers. For example, he was invited to become an associate director for the Pakistan Recovery Fund, founded by HRH Prince of Wales. Despite political sensitivities, Bokhari raised more than half of the £300,000 target.
 
Bokhari helped raise £225,000 in six months through the creation of a patron scheme for Mosaic — a mentoring charity established by HRH Prince of Wales in 2007. This has fundamentally changed the way Mosaic raises funds and has forged deeper relations with its significant donors. He now sits on the Mosaic national advisory board.
 
Bokhari has achieved more than fundraising success. He has helped many wealthy Asian people overcome a lack of trust in the mainstream charitable sector and is encouraging giving beyond the traditions of giving to family and historical home.
Beacon Awards

Contact us

Please do get in touch if you would like more information about the Beacon Awards, including the nomination and judging process.

You can also contact us if you would like to discuss a nomination in confidence.

Beacon Awards
c/o UK Community Foundations
12 Angel Gate
320 – 326 City Road
London EC1V 2PT

Tel: 0207 713 9326

Email: contact@beaconfellowship.org.uk

Beacon Awards

Beacon Awards 2013

At the 8th Beacon Awards for Philanthropy held on 6th February at Mansion House, London the Beacon Fellowship named 33 of the most prestigious philanthropists in the UK as Beacon Fellows for 2013.

The Awards, sponsored by J.P. Morgan Private Bank and supported by the City of London Corporation’s charity City Bridge Trust and Pears Foundation, celebrate outstanding philanthropic achievement made by individuals, families and small groups of individuals working collaboratively across seven distinct Beacon categories. They highlight key trends in philanthropic giving and pioneering developments including the growing focus for donations of money, along with time, talents and social capital to support future generations and local initiatives in the UK.

Collectively, the 33 Beacon Fellows have donated £100million to philanthropic causes, across a mix of local and global organisations, large institutions and grassroots charities. Causes supported include those with a strong focus on community and social issues, such as poverty and social inequality, as supported by The Volant Charitable Trust founded by J.K. Rowling, who is also commended² as a Special Award Beacon Fellow for sustained contribution to society. In addition, the 2013 Beacon Fellows have helped to reinvent philanthropy for the modern age - establishing new income generation mechanisms, philanthropic models, funding vehicles and giving platforms, with the aim of providing generations to come with a better future.

Tracey Reddings, Head of UK Private Wealth Management at J.P. Morgan Private Bank added: “The philanthropists that have been recognised across a range of categories have made a significant difference to good causes around the world, as well as those close to home. It is encouraging to see the positive impact donations have made in a period when the UK economy and individuals have been hit by recession, as well as the considerable time and effort being put into making a sustainable difference or significant impact towards such charitable projects. We hope that this year’s Beacon Fellows will promote the fulfillment that philanthropy can bring, and inspire others to start their own philanthropic journey to create legacy for generations to come.

The Beacon Fellows were selected following a stringent judging process by a panel comprising of some of the leading philanthropists, philanthropy practitioners and advisors in the UK, who whittled down a list of initial nominations made in October. The awards celebrate philanthropists who have set the standards of best practice in philanthropy and whose work in this field has made a sustainable difference, a significant impact, or work to inspire future generations.

For the first time this year, an Award for ‘City Philanthropy’ has been introduced, sponsored by the City of London Corporation’s charity, City Bridge Trust. Commenting on the Award, Alderman Roger Gifford, Lord Mayor of the City of London, said: “Centuries of philanthropic practice and understanding of the value of endowed capital have ensured the UK has very well-established and effective charity and tax law - making London a global centre for managing international philanthropic funds. By celebrating and showcasing exceptional examples of social investment and charitable support, we can inspire others and maximise the impact of philanthropic giving.”

Commenting on receiving the Judges’ Special Award, J.K. Rowling OBE and Founder of The Volant Charitable Trust noted: Being recognised by The Beacon Fellowship means a great deal to me; it validates the work we are doing at The Volant Charitable Trust while recognising the value of giving in a thoughtful and intelligent manner, both of which we strive to do.

“None of us who are privileged in our daily lives and fortunate enough to have more money than we need should require a pat on the back for the act of giving, but we do need help to spread the word that responsible giving can make a difference; to individuals and communities, locally, nationally, and internationally. The Beacon Awards are a great way to convey that message.”

For profiles of the 2013 Fellows please visit the fellows section of the website. The full list of fellows is:

Beacon Award for City Philanthropy
Harvey McGrath
John Stone
2011/12 Young Philanthropy Syndicate Founders (Michael Harris, Adam Pike, Sam Cohen, Alex Dwek, Alex Gardner, Paul Gorrie, Niccolo Manzoni, Jack Prevezer, Conor Quinn)

Beacon Award for Targeted Philanthropy
Paul Marshall
Gordon Morrison

The Beacon Award for Philanthropy Advocate
Angila Chada & Michael McKibbin
Harris Bokhari
Sir Thomas Hughes-Hallett
Kavita Oberoi

Beacon Award for Place-Based Philanthropy
Nick Ferguson CBE & Jane Ferguson
Jack Morris OBE

The Beacon Award for Cultural Philanthropy
Carol Colburn Grigor CBE
Lloyd Dorfman CBE
Sir Vernon Ellis

The Beacon Award for Impact Investment
Sir Ronald Cohen
Nick O’Donohoe
John Pontin OBE & Wendy Stephenson

Beacon Award for Pioneering Philanthropy
Richard Bradbury CBE
Stephen Dawson OBE
Michael Norton OBE
Marcelle Speller OBE

Four Special awards were made by board of judges to the following, commended for demonstrating the highest standards of philanthropy in the UK today
Sir Vernon Ellis
Harvey McGrath
J.K. Rowling OBE
John Stone

Beacon Awards

Beacon Awards 2010

Held in the splendour of the Goldsmiths' Hall in the City of London and hosted by Martyn Lewis CBE, the Beacon Awards 2010 recognised some great philanthropic achievements.

Beacon Awards

Message from our Chair

The Beacon Awards celebrate giving by individuals whose philanthropy has achieved an impact that needs to be more widely shared.

Modern philanthropy is developing in new and exciting ways, providing support for an array of causes, activities and needs and often using non-traditional and innovative approaches. It is no longer the preserve of an older generation as more and more young people are becoming involved.  

The growth of social enterprise, where social aims take precedence over financial returns, is just one example of the change that is taking place. There is now  greater awareness of the importance of measuring the impact of the philanthropic gift, as well as understanding the relationship between donor and recipient.  

We are confident that the awards will generate a strong pool of nominees whose philanthropic practice will act as a Beacon for others to follow,  and are delighted that J.P. Morgan is joining us as principal sponsor, with City Bridge Trust and Pears Foundation providing additional support. 

I would like to thank our sponsors for their generosity and commitment to the Beacon ideals of celebrating and promoting philanthropy.

Gay Huey Evans
Chair, Beacon Awards

Beacon Awards

About our sponsors

The Beacon Awards would not be possible without the generous support of our sponsors

J.P.Morgan

J.P. Morgan Private Bank is delighted to be lead sponsor of the Beacon Awards for the third consecutive year.
 
This partnership reinforces our commitment to philanthropy which started more than 180 years ago with our founders - John Pierpont Morgan, George Peabody and John D. Rockefeller - and continues today through our corporate foundation. We are privileged to work with clients and foundations at every stage of their giving journey, creating a vibrant community of like-minded philanthropists.
 
J.P. Morgan Private Bank manages $992bn* of assets and brings together all the disciplines of wealth management to advance our clients’ goals. Our integrated approach, commitment to innovation and integrity, and focus on client service has made J.P. Morgan the advisor of choice to wealthy individuals and their families around the world.
 
To start a conversation, please email Rebecca Eastmond, Head of the Philanthropy Centre in Europe, Middle East and Africa, at rebecca.a.eastmond@jpmorgan.com
 
*At 24/11/2014

City Bridge Trust

The elected City of London Corporation supports and promotes the UK-based international finance and business sector – and also supports London’s communities, its green spaces and its heritage.  The City of London Corporation’s charity, City Bridge Trust, is London’s largest independent grant-making trust, distributing around £18m annually to charitable organisations working to reduce disadvantage in London.  

The City Bridge Trust’s origins can be traced back to the 12th Century when funds were raised to build the first stone bridge across the River Thames – London Bridge.  Today, the City of London Corporation remains responsible for the maintenance of this bridge and of Blackfriars Bridge, Southwark Bridge , Tower Bridge and the Millennium Bridge.  Since 1995, the Trust has been able to make funds surplus to these bridge requirements available to support charitable work in London.
 

Pears Foundation

Pears Foundation is a British family foundation rooted in Jewish values. Our work is concerned with positive identity and citizenship while our approach is based on research and the urge to ask questions. Our programmes set out to increase respect and understanding between people of different backgrounds and faiths, encourage both the quantity and quality of philanthropy and offer support to the communities and causes we care about. 
Beacon Awards

Beacon Fellows

Since the first Beacon Awards ceremony in 2003, more than 70 individuals have been honoured as Beacon Fellows in recognition of their exceptional contribution to charitable and social causes.

By celebrating their achievements, we aim to create wider awareness of philanthropy and provide inspiration for others to follow.

We see many extraordinary examples of philanthropy at Beacon, and it is both humbling and uplifting to learn of the difference that effective giving can make in changing lives for the better.

The Beacon Awards 2013 will generate a new cohort of Beacon Fellows and we look forward to welcoming them to the Beacon Fellowship.

Beacon Awards

Nominations for the Beacon Awards 2015 are open - deadline extended to midday on Monday 8 December

The main award for 2015 is the Beacon Award for Philanthropy. In addition Beacon will also be presenting:
 
   •   Beacon Award for Outstanding Philanthropic Foundation
   •   Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropist and a Charity
   •   Beacon Award for City Philanthropy (sponsored by the City of London Corporation’s charity, City Bridge
       Trust through its project City Philanthropy – A Wealth of Opportunity)
   •   Beacon Award for Cultural Philanthropy
   •   Beacon Award for Impact Investment
 
Before preparing a nomination please thoroughly read this guidance document which contains all the information about eligibility, criteria, categories and FAQs.
 
When you are ready to submit a nomination please use this online form.
Beacon Awards

The Beacon Awards for Philanthropy

The awards were set up in 2003 with the aim of promoting effective philanthropic giving through the creation of a nationally recognised awards scheme and a fellowship body of philanthropists to highlight best practice and innovation in philanthropy.

We hope that others will be inspired and encouraged to make their own contribution through the great stories of giving that emerge through the Beacon Awards.

Since 2010 the Beacon Awards have been managed by UK Community Foundations.

Beacon's Board

  • Gay Huey Evans

    Gay Huey Evans  – Chair of Trustees

    Gay Huey Evans is Deputy Chair of the Financial Reporting Council and serves on the Board of directors of Aviva plc, Conoco Phillips and Itau BBA International plc.  Gay was formerly Vice Chairman of the board and non-executive chairman, Europe, of the International Swaps and Derivatives Association, Inc. (ISDA) (financial trade association). From April 2008 to October 2010 she was Vice Chairman, Investment Banking & Investment Management at Barclays Capital. Prior to that Gay was President of Tribeca Ltd and head of governance at Citi Alternative Investments (EMEA) and Director of the Markets Division at the Financial Services Authority between 1998-2005. She held various senior management positions with Bankers Trust Company in New York and London between 1984-1998). Gay is passionate about giving back and has been involved with various non-profit organisations.  She currently serves as a Trustee of Wellbeing Women, and previously, a Trustee of Wigmore Hall, co-opted Trustee of Tate, Trustee of Benjamin Frankin House and Bucknell University.
  • Paul%20barry%20walsh

    Paul Barry-Walsh

    After leaving IBM in 1986,  Paul Barry-Walsh founded Safetynet followed by Netstore in 1996. In 2001 he founded The Fredericks Foundation which has become one of the UK’s leading micro-finance organisations,  funding 2 disadvantaged individuals per week. Paul is involved in a number of start-ups, and was granted the Queens Award for Enterprise Promotion. In 2008 he received the Beacon Award for Creating Giving.  In 2009 he was given the CNBC/FT European Philanthropist of the Year Award, and won the Entrepreneur County Inaugural Award for the Entrepreneur’s Entrepreneur in 2011.
     
  • Matthew%20bowcock%20165px

    Matthew Bowcock CBE

    Matthew Bowcock is Chair of the Community Foundation Network. He is a serial entrepreneur who has been involved in founding technology and biotechnology companies in Australia, the US and the UK. He continues to be a non-executive director of early-stage companies but is increasingly involved in philanthropy. He runs the Hazelhurst Trust, a family charitable foundation, which has set up a fund within the Surrey Community Foundation as he believes that giving is most effective when it is locally and professionally managed. He is a trustee of the Surrey Community Foundation and assists wherever possible in donor development.
  • Amb%20pic

    Anne Boyd

    A barrister by profession, Anne Boyd has had many years experience of the criminal justice system including work in prisons, criminal courts and  alternatives to custody. Her voluntary sector experience has embraced conservation of marine stocks and she has also been Chair of the Scottish Community Foundation, Vice Chair of the Community Foundation Network, and the Chair of a Lottery fund. Among current commitments she is Chair of the Council of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust and the Pitlochry Festival Theatre.
     
  • Tracey%20reddings

    Tracey Reddings

    Tracey Reddings is Managing Director and Head of UK Private Wealth Management at J.P. Morgan Private Bank. She has enjoyed a 25-year career as a banker spanning across the private, public and charitable sectors. Prior to joining J.P. Morgan, Tracey was Head of UK Private Banking at SG Hambros Bank Ltd and before that, she was Chief Executive of CAF Bank Ltd and CAF Marketing Services.  Over the years, Tracey has developed a strong track record and reputation for delivering innovation and building partnerships to create new business and enhance brand value; in 2007 she was awarded the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the Product Innovation category. Tracey is an MBA-holder and a Chartered Director; she is also a Fellow of both the Institute of Directors and the Chartered Management Institute, and a Freeman with the Guild of International Bankers. She is a trustee of the Surrey Community Foundation and Chairman of the British Bankers Association Wealth Management and Private Banking panel.
  • David Sheepshanks

    David Sheepshanks CBE

    David assumed the Chair of UK Community Foundations in 2013 and has recently joined the board of the Beacon Awards. He has held a number of high profile board positions in business, sport and charity, including Chairman of Ipswich Town Football Club and Chairman of the Football League. Today he is Chairman of St George’s Park (The National Football Centre) and FA Learning, the educational arm of The FA responsible for Coach Education and Professional Development, and a Regional Chair of Coutts amongst a number of non-executive positions. He was the Founder and first Chair of The Ipswich Town Charitable Trust and one of the founding trustees for The Suffolk Community Foundation. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in 2004 by University of East Anglia for services to the community and made CBE in the 2012 New Year’s Honours List for services to Football and Suffolk Charity.
     
Beacon Awards

Welcome to Beacon

Nominations for the Beacon Awards 2015 are open - deadline extended to midday on Monday 8 December

The Beacon Awards for Philanthropy has launched a search for the most inspirational philanthropists in the UK. Beacon Awards are presented to those whose giving will inspire others to give and contains useful lessons for other philanthropists.
 
The main award is the Beacon Award for Philanthropy. In addition Beacon will also be presenting:
 
     •    Beacon Award for Outstanding Philanthropic Foundation
     •    Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropist and a Charity
     •    Beacon Award for City Philanthropy (sponsored by the City of London Corporation’s charity, City Bridge
          Trust through its project City Philanthropy – A Wealth of Opportunity)
     •    Beacon Award for Cultural Philanthropy
     •    Beacon Award for Impact Investment
 
The deadline for the nominations is extended to midday on Monday 8 December.
 
For full information about categories and to submit a nomination please visit this page.
 
To mark the launch of the 2015 awards, and to encourage nominations, Beacon is celebrating ten inspirational philanthropists from cities around the UK, many little known, to kick start a debate about how the UK has been shaped by philanthropy and who has left a ‘philanthropy footprint’ that still affects society today. The full list can be found on this page. Check the hashtag #philanthropyfootprint to see the conversation.
 
Commenting on the launch on nominations Gay Huey Evans, Chair of the Beacon Awards, said: "The UK has a tradition of philanthropy to be proud of – from George Cadbury, the chocolate heir who set up the Bourneville Village Trust in the 19th Century, to Dame Cicely Saunders who laid the foundations of the modern day hospice movement in the 20th Century.  The Beacon Awards honour the incredible men and women who are building on that heritage in order to inspire others to give"
 
Upon receiving her Beacon Award in 2013 J.K. Rowling said; “None of us who are privileged in our daily lives and fortunate enough to have more money than we need should require a pat on the back for the act of giving, but we do need help to spread the word that responsible giving can make a difference; to individuals and communities, locally, nationally, and internationally.  The Beacon Awards are a great way to convey that message.”