Dato Dr. Kim Tan

Dato Dr. Kim Tan was awarded the Beacon Award for Impact Investment in 2017.

Biochemist Dato Dr. Kim Tan is a champion for the role of enterprise in tackling poverty. Dr. Kim is also the Chairman of SpringHill Management, a fund management company specialising in life sciences and social venture capital investing, as well as a partner of several impact funds.

One of his investments is Kuzuko Game Reserve, a 39,000 acre site which has transformed an impoverished community in Eastern Cape, South Africa into a new tourst destination. The reserve is the largest contributor to the local economy, providing over 350 jobs and career training for young people from disadvantaged backgrounds. The site also protects three endangered species. The local Mayor called Dr. Kim 'a catalyst of social transformation'.

Kuzuko is just one venture in the portfolio of INQO, Dr. Kim’s social impact investment company that invests in enterprises tackling poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa. Others include Bee Sweet Honey, which provides 12,000 farmers in Zambia with the means to produce organic honey; and Spekboom, a project replanting 14,000 hectares of the plant of the same name, creating over 150 jobs and restoring degraded land in the Eastern Cape.

Beacon Awards

Shalni Arora

Judges' Special Award

Geneticist and entrepreneur Shalni Arora is working on several fronts to create a fairer and more just world for the most poor and marginalised in India and the UK.

Her foundation Savannah Wisdom, set up in 2011, partners with charities and not for profit organisations with game-changing initiatives in areas such as legal rights, child protection, corruption and peace and security.

“In particular, Savannah Wisdom is keen to find ways to re-balance the inequality in access to legal rights faced by women in India. We support organisations who take on pro bono legal work and public interest litigation cases on issues around violence against women and gender inequality.”

The Foundation is a supporter of the British Asian Trust, where Shalni is also a Trustee. “The British Asian Trust is an excellent partner for someone like me, who is based here, as they facilitate our work through their in-depth knowledge of the sector in South Asia.”

Beacon Awards

Ben Handford & Norfolk Future Fund

Judges’ Special Award

Business owner Ben Handford is founding member of a Norfolk giving collective that is creating a pipeline of younger business-minded donors for the county, helping to make a positive difference to the community in which they live and work.

There are 45 members of the Norfolk Future Fund thanks to Ben’s enthusiasm and the ambassadorial role he has taken in driving this initiative. Between them, they have given £79,000 to scores of local grassroots organisations since 2014.

The Norfolk Future Fund is the brainchild of Norfolk Community Foundation’s Graham Tuttle who is passionate about engaging a new generation of donors. “I believe we have established a window of influence. Thanks to people like Ben, we are shaping people’s philanthropy as they go along – starting them on a journey and encouraging a more thriving culture of giving which we hope will inspire them to become the big philanthropists of the future.”

Beacon Awards

Justin Byam Shaw

Judges’ Special Award

Evening Standard Chairman Justin Byam Shaw, wants to help eradicate food poverty in London through the ‘breathtakingly obvious’ plan of addressing industry food waste.

The UK food industry throws away more than 710k tonnes of food each year, while many Londoners don’t get enough to eat and many eat no fresh food at all. Just 7% of the edible surplus reaches charities and food banks.

“This glaring mismatch of supply and demand is attractive to entrepreneurs like me. There’s more than enough food to go round. It just isn’t getting to the right people.”

The Felix Project was set up in 2016 and funded by Justin and wife Jane, in memory of their 14-year-old son, who died of Meningitis.

The Project has built a bridge between fresh, quality food that can’t be sold and front line charities, serving the homeless, the elderly and people struggling to feed themselves and their families.

Beacon Awards

Helen and Peter Wilde

Beacon Award for Local Community Philanthropy

When Helen and Peter Wilde retired they were able to set up a modest endowment fund within the South West’s Quartet Community Foundation, which was bolstered by a small inheritance.

As well as money, the couple give a lot of time and energy to various causes. Helen, who has served as Bristol’s High Sheriff for the past year, was a Trustee and chair of Home Start’s Bristol branch for more than 10 years. In 2004 she began the first regional chapter of the Funding Network that brings givers together for greater impact. Through the network, they have raised over £250,000 for more than 40 small charities.

“Charitable giving is still more of a private pursuit in the UK. People like to give anonymously. We want to give more publicly and show that people like us can make a difference. If someone asks us to put our name on something we are all for it.”

Beacon Awards

Dame Kelly Holmes DBE

Beacon Award for Philanthropy In Sport

Double Olympic champion Dame Kelly Holmes, DBE, is using her focus and determination to get the lives of disadvantaged young people back on track by employing world-class athletes to engage, enable and empower them.

“At a time where there are more than one million 16 to 25-year-olds not in education, employment or training in the UK, our work is more important than ever,” says Dame Kelly who launched her Trust in 2008, four years after her legendry Olympic win.

“Our unique team of athletes – called our GiveBack Team – are supported to realise how their attitudes from the sports arena are of great value beyond sport. They have been trained to deliver transformational and inspirational support to young people in need.”

The athletes cultivate key attitudes such as focus, resilience, motivation, confidence and determination as the outcomes of success in young people. An independent report estimated that the Trust’s Get on Track, On Track to Achieve and AQA Unlocking Potential programmes had a combined social value of £23 million.

Beacon Awards

Dato Dr. Kim Tan

Beacon Award for Impact Investment

Biochemist Dato Dr. Kim Tan is a champion for the role of enterprise in tackling poverty. Dr. Kim is also the Chairman of SpringHill Management, a fund management company specialising in life sciences and social venture capital investing, as well as a partner of several impact funds.

One of his investments is Kuzuko Game Reserve, a 39,000 acre site which has transformed an impoverished community in Eastern Cape, South Africa into a new tourst destination. The reserve is the largest contributor to the local economy, providing over 350 jobs and career training for young people from disadvantaged backgrounds. The site also protects three endangered species. The local Mayor called Dr. Kim 'a catalyst of social transformation'.

Kuzuko is just one venture in the portfolio of INQO, Dr. Kim’s social impact investment company that invests in enterprises tackling poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa. Others include Bee Sweet Honey, which provides 12,000 farmers in Zambia with the means to produce organic honey; and Spekboom, a project replanting 14,000 hectares of the plant of the same name, creating over 150 jobs and restoring degraded land in the Eastern Cape.

Beacon Awards

Martin Lewis OBE

Beacon Trailblazer Award

Campaigning journalist and household name Martin Lewis OBE, AKA the Money Saving Expert, has worked for nearly a decade to free the nation from what he calls the ‘marriage made in hell that is mental health and debt problems’.

People with mental health problems are four times as likely to be in problem debt as the rest of us. Martin aims to change that.

Though Martin never set out to make money, The Money Saving Expert site he set up aged 30 for £100 has given him the opportunity to donate large amounts of money, along with time and his personal trusted brand ‘to plug the holes’ that his day job does not reach.

“I consider most of my work to be public service. I’m fortunate to have incredible reach through the site and TV to show people how to be financially savvy and avoid debt. Some have estimated the website has in total probably saved users over £10 billion.”

Beacon Awards

Jonathan Ruffer DL

Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Arts and Culture

City investor and Christian evangelist Jonathan Ruffer describes himself as ‘very Goddy’ with a calling to philanthropy, but only in the last five years of his 30-plus year giving career has he found an approach that feels comfortably right.

“It is about the preposition. It is not about doing good ‘to’ people, or ‘for’ people but doing good ‘with’ people. That is my talisman.”

To that end Jonathan is working to regenerate the depressed North East community of Bishop Auckland, 30 miles from where he was brought up in Stokesley, North Yorkshire, a former mining heartland where the unemployment rate is more than twice the national average.

He is now in charge of a grand plan for putting Bishop Auckland on the global map by creating a world class centre for Spanish art and has created Kynren – meaning family – a £30m spectacular night show, funded from the investment man’s own pocket.  Kynren’s first telling in 2016 attracted 100,000 visitors paying £40 a ticket that will be re-invested. It engaged 1,000 local volunteers as characters and 1,500 are in the pipeline for the next show.

Beacon Awards

Dame Vivienne Westwood CBE and Cool Earth

Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership between  a Philanthropist and a Charity

Fashion icon Dame Vivienne Westwood DBE is using fame and funding to save the world’s climate-protecting rainforests that are being lost at a faster rate than ever. She has donated more than £1.5m to Cool Earth, the charity that works alongside indigenous villages to halt rainforest destruction in Peru, the Congo Basin and Papua New Guinea.

Cool Earth’s model centres on developing local livelihoods to end the cycle of deforestation that entrenches villages into further poverty. It is the only charity that works solely where the threat to the forest is greatest; on the frontline of deforestation.

Dame Vivienne says: “Cool Earth has a practical plan, already working, and it will cost an incredibly small amount compared to the enormous benefit. Indeed, if we save the rainforest we might save the planet and if we don’t – forget it.”

Cool Earth’s Director Matthew Owen says of her support: “Cool Earth has never had a more hands-on supporter. Vivienne Westwood wants to understand and be involved in every stage of saving the rainforest, which makes her the most effective ambassador we could hope for.”

Beacon Awards

Alexander Hoare

Beacon Award for City Philanthropy

Eleventh generation private banker Alexander Hoare is aiming to move the dial on social investment. He has now committed more than £2m of the bank’s £10m Golden Bottle Trust endowment in a diversified portfolio of debt, equity and venture investment in ‘social-first’ entities. He believes every portfolio should include such investments that offer small uncorrelated return.

For the last decade Alexander has been leading the Hoare family’s philanthropy which has been at the heart of the private bank since it was established in the 17th century. The Golden Bottle Trust, set up in 1985, has given more than £16m to hundreds of arts, environmental, educational and health charities.

Alexander is convinced that philanthropy and social investment will continue to grow: “The new generation, the millennials, will see capital as a source for doing good as core.”

Beacon Awards

Tom Ilube

Beacon Award for Innovation

Tech entrepreneur and cyber security wizard Tom Ilube is unlike most philanthropists. He set out in 2004 with a clear 20-year vision and a strategy to leverage education to bring about change.

“When I have an idea I find some way of making it happen,” says the man voted number one in the 2017 Power list of 100 influential black Britons, and who helped co-found Egg, the first major internet bank, and Garlik, an identity protection company.

Tom is now looking for Africa’s female Einstein through the African Gifted Foundation he set up and funds, to help transform the lives of girls in the continent. In 2016 he opened Africa’s first girls’ science and technology school – the African Science Academy.

“I’d like to see them apply their skills to solve problems on the African continent. And I hope the Academy becomes a Beacon of excellence with spin-offs on the continent and across the world.”

Beacon Awards

James Thomas

Beacon Award for Philanthropy

Private Equity investor James Thomas approaches philanthropy through his professional lens. James found and backed a small group of professionals working in India, who were convinced that another approach was necessary. Together they formed a charity called Justice and Care.

“I wanted to support an organisation that saved lives, in a way that broke the cycle of crime and changed how the state operates. I also wanted scale, impact and value for money.”

Justice and Care operates mainly in India, Bangladesh, the UK and the Netherlands. It has two hundred full-time professionals who operate 24/7, including former investigators, lawyers, social workers and counsellors.

“We are building a small army that is operating strategically, saving lives in a way that can be replicated, in a way that destroys criminal networks and always working with the state.”

Beacon Awards
Header - Beacon 2017 winners

Beacon Awards 2017 winners

This year's Beacon Awards were held at Mansion House on the 9th May. There were 12 winners, coming from the worlds of sport, finance, arts and more.

James Thomas
Beacon Award for Philanthropy

Tom Ilube
Beacon Award for Innovation

Alexander Hoare
Beacon Award for City Philanthropy

Dame Vivienne Westwood DBE and Cool Earth
Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropy and a Charity

Jonathan Ruffer DL
Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Arts and Culture

Martin Lewis OBE
Beacon Trailblazer Award

Dato Dr Kim Tan 
Beacon Award for Impact Investment

Dame Kelly Holmes DBE
Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Sport

Helen and Peter Wilde
Beacon Award for Local Community Philanthropy

Shalni Arora
Judges’ Special Award

Ben Handford and the Norfolk Future Fund
Judges’ Special Award

Justin Byam Shaw
Judges’ Special Award

Beacon Awards

Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Sport

ALISTAIR BROWNLEE MBE

Alistair Brownlee MBE is a British triathlete and Olympic gold medallist. Alistair and his brother Jonny set up the Brownlee Foundation after recognising the importance of encouraging children to get fit and active. The Brownlee Foundation holds a range of endurance sport events to provide a positive sporting experience for children, with over 10,000 children set to participate by the end of the year.


JONNY BROWNLEE

Jonny Brownlee is a British triathlete, winning silver at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Jonny and his brother Alistair set up the Brownlee Foundation to encourage children to get fit and active. The Brownlee Foundation holds a range of endurance sport events – such as triathlons - to provide a positive sporting experience for children, with over 10,000 children set to participate by the end of the year.


LAWRENCE DALLALGIO OBE

Lawrence Dallaglio OBE is a former England rugby captain. Lawrence founded the Dallaglio Foundation in 2008 in memory of his mother Eileen. The Foundation’s main focus is RugbyWorks, a national programme which supports young people who have been excluded from mainstream education through a skills development programme based on the values of rugby. RugbyWorks aims to get disadvantaged young people into further education, employment, or training.


DAME KELLY HOLMES

Dame Kelly Holmes is a double Olympic gold medal-winning athlete. Kelly was motivated to leave a legacy from her successful athletics career to help disadvantaged young people – and so she founded the Dame Kelly Holmes Trust in 2008. The Trust empowers athletes through sport, education, career development, and other meaningful activities. Since its launch, the Trust has reached over 300,000 people aged 14-25 years old.


AMIR KHAN

Amir Khan is a professional boxer, and a former world champion. From a humble background, Amir decided to give back to his community by investing £700,000 to build the Gloves Community Centre in Bolton, England - providing a safe and drug-free space for underprivileged children. Amir also founded The Amir Khan Foundation, which donates to causes both home and abroad, including its flagship project building a village for orphans in Gambia.


DAVID SHEVEL AND ENGLAND FOOTBALL TEAM/FOOTBALLERS FOUNDATION

The England Footballers Foundation (EFF), established in 2007 to help football players donate their match fees and time to support good causes. Players can also use their profile to raise awareness of causes, through appearances, campaigns, and fundraising events. EFF has supported charities including Cancer Research UK, UNICEF, WellChild, and Together for Short Lives.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Award for Local Community Philanthropy

SIR ROGER DE HAAN CBE, DL

Sir Roger De Haan is the former Chairman of the Saga Group, a company selling holidays to the over-50s market. In 1978, he established the Roger De Haan Charitable Trust with his father Sidney. The Trust supports a range of charitable causes, focusing on areas in Kent. The largest project the Trust has supported is The Creative Quarter, a space for artists to use. It is managed by The Creative Foundation.


DAVID ERIC LAING

David Eric Laing is President of the Northamptonshire Association of Youth Clubs (NAYC). He has given both his time and money to community organisations across the county of Northamptonshire. David and his wife Mary have been long-time supporters of Northamptonshire Community Foundation, where he has helped hold events; lobbied local authorities to give to the Community Foundation; and on his retirement, gifted a four-storey office building.


PAT & SUSAN RUSSELL

Pat and Susan Russell have been donors of the Community Foundation for Calderdale since 2011. They established The Russell Fund after making a modest investment – which has since grown into a successful endowment fund. Currently valued at £475,000, a total of £80,000 worth of grants has been awarded to local community projects across Calderdale.


FRANCIS AND SARAH SALWAY

Francis Salway is the former CEO of Land Securities, a property investment company. Francis is also the Chairman of The London Community Foundation. Francis and his wife Sarah are committed to place-based giving, and have set up endowment funds in both Kent and London. They have supported the Building Communities in Coldharbour programme, which has helped encourage resident engagement and empowerment in Lambeth, London.


IAN & DOROTHY SUTTIE

Ian and Dorothy Suttie are philanthropists who have given charitably to causes based in Scotland and in particular, Aberdeen. They have donated at least £15 million to projects in the community, including £10 million to support The Suttie Centre for Teaching and Learning in Healthcare at the University of Aberdeen.


JANE WATES OBE

For more than 30 years, Jane Wates OBE has chaired, or been a member of committees for many charitable organisations – including The Wates Foundation, an independent grant-making Family Trust. In 1990, Jane set up her own foundation, with a focus on crime prevention and poverty alleviation for young people and families. She has also made donations to Berkshire Community Foundation and Oxfordshire Community Foundation.


HELEN & PETER WILDE

Helen and Peter Wilde are long-term supporters of Home-Start Bristol. Working with Quartet Community Foundation, Helen and Peter have channelled funding to support the charity. Home-Start Bristol provides support and practical help to families facing issues such as post-natal depression, health problems, and bereavement.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Award for Innovation

SHERRY COUTU CBE

Sherry Coutu CBE is an entrepreneur and investor. She launched The ScaleUp Institute, which aims to advance understanding on how to scale up and grow a business in the UK. Sherry founded Founders4Schools, an organisation which connects business leaders with schools. These leaders can inspire pupils, help them engage in education, and think about their career aspirations.


SIR CLIVE COWDERY

Sir Clive Cowdery is the Founder of The Resolution Group, a financial services investor. In 2005, Clive founded the Resolution Foundation – a non-partisan think-tank which aims to improve standards of living of those in Britain on low to middle incomes. The Foundation produces high-quality research and analysis to raise awareness of those struggling on low and middle incomes – and help inform policy.


IMAM MONAWAR HUSSAIN DL

Monawar Hussain is the founder of The Oxford Foundation, an organisation which aims to promote religious harmony by educating young people, and helping them realise their full potential. Monawar set up the Diamond Jubilee Legacy Fund for East Oxford with Oxfordshire Community Foundation, to support projects promoting interfaith dialogue, as well as addressing issues of deprivation in the area.


TOM ILUBE

Tom Ilube is an tech entrepreneur – and is also known for his philanthropy in the education sector. Tom set up African Gifted Foundation, which aims to transform the lives of young people by running science academies across ten different countries in Africa. In 2016, the African Science Academy opened in Ghana – providing a safe environment for girls to be taught science and maths.


FRAN PERRIN

Fran Perrin is the Founder and Director of the Indigo Trust, a grant-making foundation which aims to create positive social change. The Trust harnesses the power of technology and innovation to increase transparency and accountability. Fran also co-founded 360Giving, which helps organisations publish grants data in an open and standardised way to support grantmaking decisions.


ED WETHERED

Ed Wethered is the founder of Raise Your Hands, a membership community which supports small charities working with young children. Raise Your Hands increases the profile of organisations which might not have the resources for wide-reaching marketing strategies. Raise Your Hands also aims to make philanthropy appealing and rewarding for the next generation of philanthropists.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Trailblazer Award

LILY COLE

Lily Cole is a supermodel, actress, and social activist. She founded Impossible, a social enterprise where people share skills and post offers of help purely out of kindness, and without exchanging money. Lily has also been vocal in campaigning for the rights of migrants during the refugee crisis, and has led Project Literacy, a campaign which calls for action to tackle illiteracy across the world.


BEN HANDFORD & NORFOLK FUTURE FUND

Ben Handford is the Managing Director of Naked Marketing, a branding and design company based in Norfolk. He is also a founder member of the Norfolk Future Fund, a group where individuals work together to give to local causes. Ben’s company has provided pro bono design services to Norfolk Community Foundation from day one, and as part of the Norfolk Future Fund, has helped support various local organisations and events.


HADEEL IBRAHIM

Hadeel Ibrahim is the founding Executive Director of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation. Hadeel helped develop the Africa Center, which she is also Co-Chair of, by raising the funds required to create the multi-million dollar Center. Based in New York, the institution “provides a gateway for engagement with contemporary Africa” [1].

[1] http://www.theafricacenter.org/about/mission/


MARTIN LEWIS OBE

Martin Lewis is a campaigning broadcaster, journalist and founder of the UK’s biggest consumer website MoneySavingExpert.com. In the last year with a personal donation of £2 million he founded the Money and Mental Health Policy Institute charity, which he now chairs. It aims to find and implement policy solutions to reduce the marriage made in hell that are debt and mental health issues. His giving-strategy focuses around consumer and financial empowerment – he spearheaded and funded the successful campaign to get financial education on the national curriculum and continues to fund My Money Week in UK schools. He also created and funds financial triage at Trussell Trust food banks, and with £2 million donated to Citizens Advice, its ‘Martin Lewis Innovation Fund’ gives money to individual local bureaux to help with innovative trial projects on money, health and social care. With a £15 million charity fund, he hopes to continue to push these agendas.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropist and a Charity

KEITH BRESLAUER

For his work with The Royal Marines Charity

Keith Breslauer is the Managing Director and Senior Partner of Patron, a real estate manager. He is also a trustee of The Royal Marines Charity (RMC) – an organisation which helps support Royal Marines (both serving and veteran) and their families. Keith has worked tirelessly to support RMC, including organising work placements for veterans; and taking part in a sponsored kayak across the English Channel, which raised over £215,000.


MICHAEL CAMPBELL MBE DL

For his work with Hampshire and Isle of Wight Community Foundation

Michael Campbell MBE DL set up the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Community Foundation (HIWCF). He made a personal donation of £1 million to establish a fund which helped launch the Community Foundation. He has also donated unrestricted funds for its running costs, and was Chair of the Foundation for its first seven years.


SARAH DRIVER

For her work with the Driver Youth Trust and Ark

Sarah Driver founded the Driver Youth Trust in 2007. The charity’s mission is to improve the life chances of young children and people who may have learning or literacy difficulties – including dyslexia. The Trust has partnered with Ark, an education charity, to train teachers who work with children with literacy difficulties.


DAVID FORBES-NIXON

For his work with the DFN Charitable Foundation

David Forbes-Nixon is the co-founder, Chairman, and Chief Executive of Alcentra. David is also the Chairman of the DFN Charitable Foundation. The Foundation’s aims are to fund improved educational facilities in UK schools; sponsor research to treat Myeloma (a type of cancer); and reintroduce rarer butterfly species to parts of the British countryside.


ROGER ROSS

For his work with 10:10 UK

Roger Ross is a supporter of 10:10 UK, a charity which runs community projects to help tackle climate change at a local level. His commitment began when 10:10 UK was only six months old. Roger has helped develop the charity, through securing funding, contacts for fundraising, and providing a space to develop their projects. His support has helped communities throughout the UK – such as enabling the installation of 2370 solar panels in 80 schools across the country.


DAME VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

For her work with Cool Earth

Dame Vivienne Westwood is one of the world’s most famous fashion designers. She is also a climate change campaigner, and is currently a Patron of Cool Earth – an organisation which works with indigenous villages to protect rainforests. Dame Vivienne Westwood has donated over £1 million to Cool Earth. She has also dedicated two fashion shows to the charity, and has designed a range of t-shirts for their online shop, with proceeds going to Cool Earth’s Asháninka Project.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Award for Impact Investment

CHRIS & CLAIRE MATHIAS

Chris Mathias is a Founder Board Member of the British Asian Trust, a Foundation which supports impoverished communities in South Asia. Claire Mathias is a member of the ActionAid Ambassador Network. They are both Founders and Trustees of the Hummingbird Trust, which aims to prevent human trafficking – focusing mainly in West Bengal. The Trust’s programmes aim to tackle gender inequality and increase the resilience of whole communities.


DR KIM TAN

Dr. Kim Tan is the co-founder of the Transformational Business Network (TBN). As a passionate biotech and social entrepreneur, Kim founded a network of entrepreneurs to encourage them to become angel investors and venture philanthropists. The aim of TBN is to transform society and create economic prosperity in impoverished areas.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Arts & Culture

SARAH HOSKING

Sarah Hosking is the Founder of the Hosking Houses Trust. Sarah purchased and restored a cottage in Clifford Chambers, Warwickshire. The cottage provides a space for women to write undisturbed, and without financial constraints which may prevent them from writing. Since 2002, the Trust has hosted scriptwriters, producers, historians, biographers, and more.


VICTORIA ROBEY OBE

Victoria Robey OBE is the Chairman of the London Philharmonic Orchestra. In 2007, Victoria founded London Music Masters, which encourages young people to get involved in classical music. She has also supported the Victoria Robey Scholarship at the prestigious Royal College of Music since 2010, allowing talented musicians to learn without being limited by financial constraints.


LORD JACOB ROTHSCHILD OM GBE FBA

Lord Rothschild is the Patron of The Rothschild Foundation. The Foundation supports Waddesdon Manor, which holds a variety of events, educational talks, and exhibitions. The Foundation also has grant programmes supporting local and community initiatives which promote social welfare.


JONATHAN RUFFER DL

Jonathan Ruffer DL is an investor, art collector, and philanthropist. Jonathan is committed to supporting Bishop Auckland, County Durham – a deprived part of England close to where he was raised. He purchased a set of works by Spanish painter Zurbaran, to prevent the Church of England selling them out of the county and country. This exemplifies his commitment introducing new forms of culture to people in the North East.


TIM SAYER

Tim Sayer is a former BBC Radio journalist. With his wife Annemarie Norton, he donated their private art collection to The Hepworth Wakefield, a contemporary art gallery in Yorkshire. Tim has provided approximately 100 works, with the remaining works to be donated as a legacy gift. His generous donation will ensure that generations of visitors will be able to enjoy the collection for years to come.


SIR RICHARD STILGOE

Sir Richard Stilgoe is a renowned songwriter and musician, and has written lyrics for some of the most famous musicals in the world – including Cats, Starlight Express, and Phantom of the Opera. In 1984, he founded the Alchemy Foundation, after viewing a news report about the famine in Ethiopia. The Foundation distributes funds to provide clean water and sanitation in less developed countries, as well as supporting causes in the UK.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Award for City Philanthropy

PREM GOYAL OBE JP

Prem Goyal is an entrepreneur, philanthropist and CEO of Global Markets Consultants (GMC). In 2010, GMC launched One London. Its mission is to create a city where people of all faiths, backgrounds, and cultures live and prosper together. To date, GMC has pledged £3 million and 20,000 professional hours from its staff to ensure London taps the talent of all people and achieve equality at the top.


ALEXANDER HOARE

Alexander Hoare is currently a Partner & Director at C. Hoare & Co., the oldest privately owned bank in the UK. Alexander is committed to the philanthropic values of the Hoare family. The bank has donated over £1.4 million to The Golden Bottle Trust, which donates to Arts, Education, and Health causes, among others.


MICHAEL SHERWOOD

Michael Sherwood is the Vice Chairman of The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc., and the Co-Chief Executive Officer of Goldman Sachs International from 2005-2016. Michael founded Table-Tennis for Kids with former England table-tennis champion Matthew Syed. The charity aims to keep children off streets, increase their self-esteem, and lift kids’ aspirations. The charity has now merged with Greenhouse Sports, which hosts table tennis clubs across London.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Award for Philanthropy

SHALNI ARORA

Shalni Arora is the Founder and CEO of Savannah Wisdom, a foundation which aims to tackle social and gender inequality. The foundation works at a community level in the UK and India. Savannah Wisdom partners with local organisations to challenge corruption in healthcare delivery; and promoting sustainable, non-violent approaches to security.


SARAH BUTLER-SLOSS & MARK SAINSBURY

Siblings Sarah Butler-Sloss and Mark Sainsbury are known for their dedication to supporting action on climate change, and promoting a low-carbon economy. Through Sainsbury Family Charitable Trusts, both Sarah and Mark have funded solar powered irrigation pumps, electric waste collection vehicles, and more. They have also worked to bring the Divest-Investment initiative to Europe – calling on divestment from fossil fuel industries.


JUSTIN BYAM SHAW

Justin Byam Shaw set up the Felix Byam Shaw Foundation in memory of his son Felix, who died from Meningitis aged only 14 years old. The Felix Byam Shaw project aims to tackle food poverty in London by providing grants to organisations which are addressing hunger in London. It also provides a link between suppliers of surplus food and charities, instead of letting the food go to waste.


DENISE COATES CBE

Denise Coates is the founder of online gambling website Bet365. In 2013, Denise donated £100 million of her personal fortune and founded the Bet365 Foundation – now named the Denise Coates Foundation. The Foundation has donated to a diverse range of causes both in the UK and abroad, such as relief programmes for those affected by Typhoon Haiyan; Oxfam; and Douglas Macmillan Hospice in Stoke.


GRANT GORDON

Grant Gordon is the Chair of Philanthropy Impact, an organisation which aims to inspire and encourage philanthropy across sectors. Grant also founded The Childhood Trust, which he is now a Chair of. The Trust aims to alleviate child poverty in London by working with local organisations which work with young people. The Trust also provides match-funding for donations and practical support for these smaller charities.


DR IAIN MACRITCHIE

Dr Iain MacRitchie is the Founder of business and management consultancy MCR Holdings. In 2006, Iain founded the MCR Charitable Foundation to provide leadership, advice, and funding for education and welfare projects. The Foundation’s flagship mentoring programme, MCR Pathways, targets young people in Glasgow to engage them in education and vocational training.


SIMON NORTON

Simon Norton established the Foundation for Integrated Transport (FIT) in 2014. The Foundation’s aims are to improve public transport networks, such as local and regional bus routes; and increase car-free accessibility to leisure and tourist attractions. The Foundation has funded a range of projects which encourage sustainable transport.


PROFESSOR NATHU PURI

Professor Nathu Puri is the founder of the Purico Group – one of the biggest family private enterprises in the UK. In 1988, Professor Puri founded the Puri Foundation – which he set up with a £1 million donation. He continues to provide most of its funding. The charity’s aims are to provide financial assistance to those in extreme need; advance education; and provide recreational facilities for young people.


ASIF RANGOONWALA

Asif Rangoonwala is an entrepreneur and businessman. He is currently Chairman of the Rangoonwala Foundation, which was founded by his father, the industrialist Mohamed Rangoonwala. The Foundation aims to empower communities by improving educational and healthcare services, and working to eradicate poverty in disadvantaged areas.


SIMON SINGH MBE

Simon Singh MBE is a scientific author and journalist. In 2013, Simon made a donation to start AllTrials, a campaign which calls for past and present clinical trials to be registered, and for full methods and results to be reported. The campaign is vital to ensure people have all the information about a treatment before they start taking it. Since 2013, 719 organisations have joined AllTrials, and over 90,000 people have signed their petition.


HEATHER & DAVID STEVENS

Heather and Davis Stevens are co-founders of Admiral, an insurance company. In 2007, they established The Waterloo Foundation. In 2015, the Foundation reached its 8th anniversary, and have awarded over 1,700 grants to various organisations. The Foundation’s grant programmes focus on issues such as world development; child development; and the environment.


JESSICA & ADAM SWEIDAN

Jessica and Adam Sweidan are founders of Synchronicity Earth, which launched in January 2010 after recognising that environment and conservation fields are often overlooked in philanthropic giving. Synchronicity Earth conducts research to identify priority areas in need of funding. The organisation also seeks to inspire people and raise awareness of environmental issues through film nights, discussions, and creative events.


JAMES THOMAS

James Thomas is currently a Managing Partner at Phoenix Equity Partners, a private equity investor. James is also Chair of Justice and Care, an organisation which rescues and supports victims of human trafficking; slavery; and other abuses. Justice and Care also works with law enforcement agencies. Over 4400 people have been rescued; 893 arrests have been made; and 339 prosecution cases handled.


LORD RUMI VERJEE

Lord Rumi Verjee is a British businessman and a member of the House of Lords. He is also a renowned philanthropist, founding The Rumi Foundation in 2006 to tackle major social issues. The Foundation supports a range of projects across education, conservation, and humanitarian sectors in countries across Asia, Africa and the UK.


CATHERINE ZENNSTRÖM

Catherine Zennström is the Chair of Zennström Philanthropies, which she co-founded in 2007 with her husband Niklas. Its two main focuses are human rights and the environment. The organisation’s human rights initiatives focus mainly in Europe and Central Asia, and its current grantees include the Fund for Global Human Rights; Human Rights Watch; and Girls Not Brides.

Beacon Awards

This year’s nominees

Click the links below to read more about the nominees for each category.

Beacon Award for Philanthropy

Shalni Arora
Sarah Butler-Sloss & Mark Sainsbury
Justin Byam Shaw
Denise Coates CBE
Grant Gordon
Dr Iain MacRitchie
Simon Norton
Professor Nathu Puri
Asif Rangoonwala
Simon Singh MBE
Heather Stevens & David  Stevens
Jessica Sweidan & Adam Sweidan
James Thomas
Lord Rumi Verjee
Catherine Zennström


Beacon Award for City Philanthropy

Prem Goyal OBE JP
Alexander Hoare
Michael Sherwood


Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Arts & Culture

Sarah Hosking
Victoria Robey OBE
Jacob Rothschild OM GBE FBA
Jonathan Ruffer DL
Tim Sayer
Sir Richard Stilgoe


Beacon Award for Impact Investment

Please note not all nominations have been listed as some nominations are confidential.

Chris Mathias & Clare  Mathias
Dr Kim Tan


Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropist and a Charity

Keith Breslauer & The Royal Marines Charity
Michael Campbell MBE DL & Hampshire and Isle of Wight Community Foundation
Sarah Driver & Driver Youth Trust and Ark
David Forbes-Nixon & DFN Charitable Foundation
Roger Ross & 10:10 UK
Dame Vivienne Westwood & Cool Earth


Beacon Trailblazer Award

Lily Cole
Ben Handford and Norfolk Future Fund
Hadeel Ibrahim
Martin Lewis OBE


Beacon Award for Innovation

Sherry Coutu CBE
Sir Clive Cowdery
Monawar Hussain DL
Tom Ilube
Fran Perrin
Ed Wethered


Beacon Award for Local Community Philanthropy

Sir Roger De Haan CBE, DL
David Eric Laing
Pat Russell & Susan Russell
Francis Salway & Sarah Salway
Ian Suttie & Dorothy Suttie
Jane Wates OBE
Helen Wilde & Peter Wilde


Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Sport

Alistair Brownlee MBE & Jonny  Brownlee
Lawrence Dallaglio OBE
Dame Kelly Holmes
Amir Khan
David Shevel and England Football Team/Footballers Foundation

Beacon Awards

Beacon Awards

Baron Amir Bhatia OBE

Baron Amir Bhatia OBE is a businessman and politician, who is known for his pioneering work promoting voluntary and charitable opportunities among ethnic minority groups.

He helped establish the Council of Ethnic Minority Voluntary Sector Organisations (CEMVO).

Beacon Awards

Diana Barran

Diana Barran was awarded a Beacon Prize in 2007 for her charitable work against domestic violence. 

Diana was previously a hedge fund manager, but was made aware of the issues surrounding domestic abuse when she began working with New Philanthropy Capital, a philanthropy advising service. After much research, Diana concluded that services were failing victims of domestic violence. 

Diana was encouraged to set up a charity to help domestic abuse victims. She founded Caada (Co-ordinated Action Against Domestic Abuse) in 2004, which has since been renamed as Safelives. Safelives train domestic violence professionals, advise comissioners on how to tackle domestic abuse at a local level, and advise policymakers using their on-the-ground expertise and data.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Awards

Nick Moon

Nick Moon was awarded the Beacon Prize for Creative Giving in 2003. 

Nick co-founded ApproTec, a social enterprise which supported the launch of 35000 small businesses in Kenya and Tanzania since 1996. ApproTec provides tools to help subsistence farmers move to commercial farming by making and then selling the tools are a low cost.

Farmers can recoup this cost within six months; and make $1200 of profit each year. ApproTec has since been renamed as KickStart International.

Beacon Awards

Kate McVeigh

Kate McVeigh was awarded the Beacon National Prize in 2006, for Northern Ireland.

Kate was recognised for her work supporting children with autism in Northern Ireland.

Beacon Awards

Jason Maude

Jason Maude was awarded the Beacon Prize for Start Ups in 2003. 

He was recognised for setting up the Isabel Healthcare. The charity distributes a medical tool which helps produce correct diagnoses in countries with fewer medical resources. The diagnostic tool is practical and easy-to-use. 

Discounts are given to clinicians and hospitals in developing country, to expand its reach. From 2012, the Symptom Check has been made available free of charge to patients. The charity now produces a range of healthcare diagnostic tools to educate future healthcare workers, as well as help patients find out more about their symptoms and seek professional health advice.

Beacon Awards

Paul Marshall

Paul Marshall was awarded the Beacon Prize for Targeted Philanthropy in 2013. Paul is a Co-Founder and Trustee of the global children's charity ARK. 

Paul is co-founder of one of the City’s leading hedge funds, is a radical educational reformer who has founded and supported a number of pioneering organisations to raise standards, spread excellence and create opportunities for children in disadvantaged communities.

Co-founder and trustee of global children’s charity ARK (Absolute Return for Kids) and Chairman of ARK Schools, established in 2004, Marshall is a driving force behind the focus on tackling economic and social disadvantage through quality education.

ARK now runs 18 academies, funded through a mix of City money and public money, with plans to rise to 50 academies in the next five years. It is one of England’s best performing academy networks, doubling and even trebling GCSE success rates in some schools.

ARK Schools have been the seedbed for many innovative initiatives, including The Future Leaders and Teaching Leaders programmes that train leaders for inner city schools. These are now national programmes which are having a demonstrable impact on student attainment in the 200 challenging schools in which they operate.

In India, ARK has pioneered the rollout of voucher schemes to enable the poorest children to access low cost private schools. In Uganda, 21,500 children will be educated at 10 new ARK-supported secondary schools over 10 years.

Marshall is also Chairman of the Management Committee of the independent think tank, Centreforum, which was relaunched with his support in 2006.

ARK - which stands for Absolute Returns for Kids - is an international children's charity based in the UK. Founded in 2002, its purpose was to improve the life chances of children by running educational programmes across the world; and establishing a chain of academy schools in the UK. Currently, there are 35 Ark schools in the UK, with the first being founded in 2006.

ARK has also opened schools outside of the UK. In India, for example, ARK aims to create a network of schools with high-quality teaching; but without the school fees. ARK's aim is to inspire and help the development of as many young people as possible.

Beacon Awards

Matthew Orr

Matthew Orr was awarded the Beacon Special Prize in 2006. Matthew co-founded ShareGift with Claire Mackintosh, who was also honoured with the Beacon Special Prize. Claire and Matthew were awarded the prize “for their joint innovation and creativity in charitable fundraising through the creation of ShareGift.”

ShareGift is an innovative charity which provides a solution to the problem of small, individually unsaleable holdings of shares and associated cash amounts. Donations of shares - however low the value - are accepted, transferred, aggregated and sold when possible. The funding stream generated in this way is directed to a wide range of charities. Over £25 million has been donated to more than 2,000 charities, large and small, since ShareGift’s inception in 1996. Additionally, significant administrative savings are made by companies because of ShareGift’s work.

Claire and Matthew demonstrate what can be achieved with an entrepreneurial approach to philanthropy, which in the case of ShareGift has produced impactful and innovative results.

Beacon Awards

Claire Mackintosh

 

www.robgreig.com

Viscountess Mackintosh of Halifax was awarded the Beacon Special Prize in 2006. Claire co-founded ShareGift with Matthew Orr, who was also honoured with the Beacon Special Prize. Claire and Matthew were awarded the prize “for their joint innovation and creativity in charitable fundraising through the creation of ShareGift.”

ShareGift is an innovative charity which provides a solution to the problem of small, individually unsaleable holdings of shares and associated cash amounts. Donations of shares - however low the value - are accepted, transferred, aggregated and sold when possible. The funding stream generated in this way is directed to a wide range of charities. Over £25 million has been donated to more than 2,000 charities, large and small, since ShareGift’s inception in 1996. Additionally, significant administrative savings are made by companies because of ShareGift’s work.

Claire and Matthew demonstrate what can be achieved with an entrepreneurial approach to philanthropy, which in the case of ShareGift has produced impactful and innovative results.

Beacon Awards

Michie MacDonald

Michie MacDonald was awarded a Beacon Prize for New Initiatives in 2010, along with her husband Angus. They are founders are the Moidart Trust, which supports local businesses and fuels enterprise in isolated communites in the West and North-West of Scotland. These areas often have a shortage of skilled workers; but the potential to be thriving communities.

Beacon Awards

Angus MacDonald OBE

Angus MacDonald OBE was awarded the Beacon Prize for New Initiatives in 2010, along with his wife Michie. Angus was recognised for the creation of the Moidart Trust, which offers awards for enterprise in West and North-West Scotland. 

The aim of the Trust was to tackle the ongoing decline of communities in the West of Scotland, by focusing on support for local enterprises. Angus is also the founder of the Caledonian Challenge, which has raised over £10 million for the Community Foundation for Scotland.

Beacon Awards

Jonathan Moulds CBE

City supremo Jonathan Moulds has taken up the baton for the arts. He is a passionate patron, particularly of music, and an advocate for more giving among the business community.

Moulds’ philanthropic prescription is ‘excellence, education and innovation’ and world-renowned London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) fits the bill perfectly, having its own education centre, and now aiming to reach wider audiences through digital technology.

Moulds has been a board director of LSO since 2006. In 2011 he took up the challenge of chairing the newly-formed LSO development board, and in 2012 launched its most ambitious fundraising campaign to date, LSO Moving Music. It will enable LSO to take the orchestra’s music out of the concert hall to millions across the world via the digital sphere.

Moving Music aims to raise £6m for LSO’s endowment trust by May 2015, thereby releasing £3m match funding from Arts Council England. Besides chairing the campaign, Moulds has donated the largest single gift LSO has received from an individual, that in turn has inspired more donations. “If I and others can be good examples of giving, then I think that is a good thing. Many people could give more time, skills and money but I don’t think it is just a numbers game. Recognition for those givers who make gifts relevant to their wealth, or who give time and skills is just as important,” says Moulds, who hankers after a more US approach to giving.

“Having spent much of my career in the US I have seen a very different mindset. They come to the table thinking ‘how can I help’ and there is a lot of peer pressure to give more,” says Moulds. On retiring from Bank of America Merrill Lynch in 2012, Moulds devoted himself to encouraging arts philanthropy on a broader platform, taking over the helm of Arts & Business (A&B) that is redefining the contract between business and the arts. Moulds has committed time, energy and advice helping A&B to re-find its feet.

He has now returned to work in the City, taking up the position of Group Chief Operating Officer for Barclays PLC in Febrauary 2015. Moulds’ philanthropy goes beyond organisations. An accomplished violinist, he is a collector of priceless Stradivarius, Guadagnini and Guarneri, that he loans to bright new talent, including Scotland’s Nicola Benedetti and LSO Leader Roman Simovic.

“Collecting began as a passion, and gave a good financial return, but then I thought I could do something good too by loaning out instruments. I encourage them to be used to educate others. I want to see a broader leveraged educational component in everything I give to. Supporting the arts is not necessarily about creating the next great soloist but instilling a sense of pride in people and inspiring them in what they do,” says Moulds.

Beacon Awards

Mary Woodworth

Mary Woodworth was awarded the Community Builder Beacon Prize in 2010 with her husband Keith. Together, they founded a community-based orphan care programme which supports over 4500 children, through a network of 14 centres in Mulanje, Malawi.

The programme, called Friends of Mulanje Orphans (FOMO), aims to improve healthcare through their outreach clinic; deliver formal and informal education programmes; and increase food security and production. The programme also provides resources for schools,and personal items such as soap, clothes, blankets and mosquito nets.

Beacon Awards

Keith Woodworth

Keith Woodworth was awarded the Community Builder Beacon Prize in 2010 with his wife Mary. Together, they founded a community-based orphan care programme which supports over 4500 children, through a network of 14 centres in Mulanje, Malawi.

The programme, called Friends of Mulanje Orphans (FOMO), aims to improve healthcare through their outreach clinic; deliver formal and informal education programmes; and increase food security and production. The programme also provides resources for schools,and personal items such as soap, clothes, blankets and mosquito nets.

Beacon Awards

Sir Ian and Lady Helen Wood

Helping people to help themselves is the driving force of Sir Ian and Lady Helen Wood’s venture philanthropy. Describing himself as a ‘dyed in the wool businessman’ with ‘a truly global mind set’ – the legacy of a globetrotting career leading The John Wood Group’s worldwide oil and gas business – Sir Ian is in the process of creating a sustainable tea business in two areas of Africa, partnered by the Sainsbury family’s Gatsby Trust.

The project now involves 45,000 smallholders and estate workers (around 11,000 in Rwanda and 35,000 in Tanzania including 2,000 factory workers) who have so far doubled their income as a direct result of the many-faceted and multi-layered support they receive. It includes providing smallholders with fertiliser and agronomists to improve the quality, yield and price of tea crops; creating Farm Field schools to educate them about business and farming; investment in tea factories, planting green field sites and embedding onsite management teams to co-ordinate the support.

Sir Ian says: “I saw this as much a business challenge as anything else. We did the research and chose something we could be effective at and measure. Then we put the plan into action.” The initial plan was to support existing projects but Sir Ian says he was “surprised and disappointed by the lack of existing implementable agricultural projects in Africa to which we could add our money. So we created them ourselves.”

Sir Ian, who also describes himself as a ‘pessimist’, is only now, after six years, allowing himself to feel a modicum of satisfaction. “Generally, I don’t feel good because it is not going fast enough and there is still a lot more to do but we are starting to see some improvement. Farmers are just starting to display entrepreneurial behaviour and be more hopeful. That does make me feel good.”

Closer to home The Wood Foundation (TWF) is funding a project in the family’s native Scotland that encourages philanthropy among schoolchildren. The Youth Philanthropy Initiative (YPI), set up in Canada by MAC Cosmetics founder Julie Toskan-Casale, was brought to Scotland by TWF in 2008. Now in 150 secondary schools, year groups are split into teams to research need in their communities and select charities they feel best serve them. They then make presentations to judging panels, on which Lady Helen Wood often sits, and winning charities are given £3000. The aim is to extend the project across all 300 of Scotland’s secondary schools to involve 30,000 children and turn it into a sustainable venture. “YPI is having a great impact and we see children really fired up and continuing to work with their chosen charities. They get a taste of charity and realise they can do something to help,” says Sir Ian.

Another TWF initiative, the Global Learning Project, brings Africa and Scottish education together to create new understanding and tolerance. It funds Scottish teachers to visit African schools to teach and return with new insights to impart to their own classes.

“If you can increase the knowledge and experience of people across the globe and help them help themselves, then you can say you have contributed,” says Sir Ian.



Beacon Awards

Michael Wood

Michael Wood founded the charity Rope (Relief of Oppressed People Everywhere) 15 years ago, an international charity driven by Christian values to help some of the world's poorest people. Rope has since expanded to 85 countries in the world, by supporting Christian nationals to help deprived people in their own countries - especially widows and orphans.

Ropeholders are the names given to the Christian locals who are experts in their own community - and thus, have unique insights to meet the needs of the local community; and deliver change. 

The work of Rope includes, but is not limited to: building schools and homes in disaster-hit areas; building wells to bring fresh water supplies to communities in remote areas; deliver education programmes; and trained displaced people to farm their land. 

Beacon Awards

Robert Wilson

Robert Wilson is the Founder and Director of READ International, a charity which aims to improve education and literacy rates in Tanzania.

Robert began by collecting previously owned books from secondary schools, amassing thousands of books. In the summer of 2005, 25,000 of those books were then delivered to Tanzania to 

READ International now works with Tanzanian volunteers from local universities to create libraries in secondary schools, by converting disused classrooms. Beyond this, the charity also delivers mentorship and top-up programmes to develop their skills and boost their employability after leaving school.

READ International has donated over 1.4 million books to Tanzania and has created 86 libraries in Secondary Schools.

Beacon Awards

Carol Wiggins

Carol Wiggins, unlike many other winners of Beacon Prizes, is not a business owner; a politician; or a founder of a charity. The fact she won the Beacon Prize for Leadership in 2003 is evident that charitable giving comes in many forms, and from all walks of life.

Carol was recognised for helping regenerate the area of Huyton in Merseyside, where she lives. Formerly a factory town, there are many families living in Huyton with four generations of unemployment. Drug use and crime rates are high, and nearly 80% of students fail to achieve 5 A*-C grades at GCSE; the government's recommended target.

Carol described herself as a typical Huyton resident - she left home without any qualifications, but was determined to work. She lived in poverty, with her children, after two jobs which didn't work out.

When Carol's father passed away, it was her catalyst to make a change to her life - and the lives of those in her local community. She formed the Huyton Community Partnership, gathering a group of local residents to knock on doors and talk to residents to gain an understanding of the main issues facing the area. 

The Huyton Community Partnership now offers opportunities for people to gain education and training. It differs from colleges, which are often perceived as too intimidating. Projects which have been set up afterward employed teenagers who were excluded from school - and are now in full-time employment. Crime rates went down by 45%, and seven out of ten teeanagers who attended after-school projects in Hillywood are not doing degree courses.

Beacon Awards

Benjamin Wells

Benjamin Wells was awarded the Beacon Prize for Young Philanthropist for his work helping marginalised Roma communities in Romania.

Benjamin's work focused mainly on helping HIV/AIDS orphans, which began when he visited Romania while on a gap year. He only intended to stay for four months - but that then turned into five years. He spent those years supporting neglected children living in state-run orphanages in Romania - children whose futures were blighted due to their HIV/AIDS diagnosis.

Benjamin sought to change this by creating a school for them to live in; receive education, and eventually join the Romanian education system. Through the support of the school, the children are given opportunities for life - and most importantly of all - hope.

Beacon Awards

Sir Peter Vardy DL and Lady Margaret Vardy

Vision, drive, a strong Christian faith, a well-endowed family foundation and a flair for building effective systems has led Sir Peter Vardy to deliver philanthropic projects on a grand scale. Sir Peter has been a sponsor of five City Technology Colleges and City Academies in the North of England that have received Ofsted ratings from ‘good’ to ‘outstanding’. Now, mirroring the scaling feat which took his retail car business from one rural garage and six staff, to 100 garages and 6000 staff across the UK, Sir Peter is creating an initiative to help thousands of families in crisis by marshalling 100,000 volunteers “to do for a stranger what they would do for a friend”.

The Safe Families for Children (SFFC) programme will be, says Sir Peter, “one of the most transformative initiatives this country has seen by creating a route for people to get involved in social action. It will cut the number of children going into care which for all too many is the start of a journey into offending and a life destroyed”. Sir Peter saw this for himself when visiting a young offenders’ institute and learning that 60% of inmates had been in the care system.

“As in business, I wanted to find a solution to the cause rather than deal with the symptoms,” says Sir Peter. Research led him to a Chicago-based initiative that in some areas has halved the number of children going into care by using community ‘befrienders’. With his own money, he piloted the American model through local authorities in the North East of England with great success. Now with match funding from the Department for Education’s Innovation Fund (IF), Sir Peter is rolling out the programme in Greater Manchester, Merseyside, East and West Midlands and the Solent, as well as in Scotland and Wales.

Families experiencing difficulties are given support and space to address their problems by “an army of volunteers” who befriend parents, host children for short periods of time and provide services such as debt counselling, as well as donating goods such as furniture, toys and clothes. After receiving the service for free in the first year, funded by the IF, local authorities are asked to contribute around £50,000 (the same cost as putting one child into care) to help pay for full-time staff to manage the volunteers.

One local authority estimates that the first year saving will exceed £1.4m. With over 93,000 children taken into care in 2014, the potential savings to the public purse are enormous and the support to keep families together will be invaluable. The aim is for SFFC to be rolled out across the UK within 10 years. Sir Peter is also a passionate supporter of people as they leave prison, homeless people or those suffering the effects of substance abuse. The Vardy Foundation partnered with Betel International to set up Betel House in Hexham in September 2011. It provides each person with a home, a community to belong to and meaningful work: “a fresh start in life with no waiting, no costs and no addictive substances,” explains Sir Peter.

As a ‘custodian’ of wealth, Sir Peter believes he has a responsibility to give something back: “I have been very fortunate in growing my company. I have enjoyed a period of success and now for the remainder of my life my aim is to have a period of significance, improving the lives and the life chances for as wide a range of society as possible.”



Beacon Awards

Alex Timpson

The late Alex Timpson was awarded a Beacon Prize for in 2010 for Family Business Philanthropy. 

Along with her husband John Timpson - who was also awarded a Beacon Prize - Alex fostered 90 children over a period of 31 years. She was able to use her experience of being a foster mother when advising other foster parents, and supporting families whose children re-joined them after being in care.

Alex's philanthropic activity helped save a primary school near her home - Delamere Church of England Primary School - from closure. She provided a donation and persuaded the management to focus on opening pupils' eye to a "world of possibility".

Beacon Awards

Jane Tewson CBE

The charitable work carried out by Jane Tewson CBE is extensive, to say the least. Her philanthropic activites go beyond donating money. Rather, they are rooted in her belief that charity should encourage people to be actively involved, as this forms a crucial part of social transformation.

Arguably, Jane's most significant and well-known charitable contribution is her pioneering work with Comic Relief, which has raised over £1 billion since it began. 

She has also founded Pilotlight UK and Igniting Change. Both organisations work to build capacity and strengthen charitable organisations, helping them grow sustainably.

Jane also contributed significantly to other charitable organisations and inititatives, such as Timebank; The Corporate Responsibility Index; Melbourne Cares; and Feet First for Homeless People.

Beacon Awards

Young Philanthropy Syndicate - Founders

In 2013, a group of individuals were recognised for their work in promoting philanthropy among young people. Young Philanthropy is an organisation which aims to educate and empower a new generation of philanthropists to change society.

Young Philanthropy's main initiative is the Young Philanthropy Syndicate, which encourages young professionals to join together and invest their time, money and skills in niche charitable causes. This is then match-funded and supported by more senior philanthropists.

The founders of the Young Philanthropy Syndicate were Michael Harris, Adam Pike, Sam Cohen, Alex Dwek, Alex Gardner, Paul Gorrie, Niccolo Manzoni, Jack Prevezer, and Conor Quinn.

Beacon Awards

Bridgadier Peter Stewart-Richardson

The late Peter Stewart-Richardson was awarded a Beacon Prize in 2004 for Risk Taking. Peter served in the army until he retired in 1981. During his time in Afghanistan in the early 1990s, he helped renovate a hospital at Chak-e-Wardak. He was then approached to help convert a basic first-aid post into a maternity clinic in the district of Rokha.

 Wih the help of comrades, the site was cleared and two new wards were built. With this, began Afghan Mother Child and Rescue. Their work was crucial in an area with high infant and maternal mortality rates, and where two-thirds of women are illiterate. By 2000, the clinic was up and running, followed by six more being built. 

For his efforts, Peter was awarded an OBE.

Beacon Awards

Dr Mora Scott MBE

The late Dr Mora Scott was a GP for 40 years, and was recognised by the Beacon Fellowship for her outstanding controbution to Children 1st - an Scottish children's charity.

Dr Mora is considered to be one of Scotland's leading figures in fighting child abuse. She began her charity work in 1948, with Charity 1st, which was then called Royal Scottish Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children. She encouraged adults who had been abused as children to help others recover from their own experiences of child abuse, as well as referring cases of abused and neglected children to her committee.

Beacon Awards

Lord David Rowe-Beddoe

Sir David Rowe-Beddoe was awarded the Beacon Prize for Wales for his contribution to the economic and social development of Wales. He has contributed signficantly to the performing arts, having been a music scholar at Llandaff Cathedral School.

Beacon Awards

Dame Benita Refson DBE

Dame Benita Refson DBE was awarded the Judges Special Award in 2010. She is the President and Trustee of Place2Be, an organisation which provides emotional and therapeutic services in primary and secondary schools across England, Scotland, and Wales.

So far, Place2Be has reached a school population of 116,000, to help them cope with bullying, bereavement, domestic violence, neglect, and trauma. Place2Be also provides support for parents, teachers, and school staff.

Under Dame Benita's leadership, Place2Be has increased the number of people which have benefitted from their services, in more than 250 schools. There are now over 3500 professionals a year working with children, who have received specialist training from Place2Be. For her generous charitable activity,  Dame Benita was awarded a DBE in 2016.

Beacon Awards

Sir Alec Reed

Sir Alec Reed is the founder of the UK's largest job hunting website service. He was awarded a Beacon Prize for Effective Giving in 2010 for his generous charitable activities.

Sir Alec founded The Big Give in October 2007, a website which allows visitors to discover and donate to causs which matter most to them. The Big Give has helped raised over £74 million for charities across the UK. The Big Give is supported by the Reed Foundation, which Sir Alec also founded.

The Reed Foundation supports hundreds of charities both in the UK and abroad, and promote education, poverty relief, and help those with illnesses.

Beacon Awards

Niall Quinn MBE

Niall Quinn is a former professional footballer for Sunderland. At his testimonial match in 2002, Niall donated the proceeds of the match to children's hospitals in Sunderland and Dublin, an act which encouraged his fellow players to also donate to charity. 

In total, at least £1 million was raised from the testimonial match. A portion of the proceeds was also donated to help education children in Africa and Asia. 

In an interview with The Sunday Times, Niall commented: "This game and the money we are going to raise, it isn't me standing up and deserving credit.

"I have abused the privileged life I have had and if this match is anything, it is me paying my debt."

Beacon Awards

John Profumo CBE

The late John Profumo CBE was known for his fundraising activities for Toynbee Hall, a charity which aims to reduce wealth and social inequalities.

Coming from a colourful political background, Profumo dedicated much of his time as chief fundraiser for Toynbee Hall, drawing on his political skills and contacts to raise large sums of money.

Profumo was appointed a CBE in 1975 for his extensive charitable activity - all of which he carried out as a volunteer.

Today, Toynbee Hall provides a range of programmes and activities including debt and legal advice, community engagement, and help for the youth and the elderly.

Beacon Awards

Rosalind Portman

Rosalind Portman is one of the three co-founders of Family Links, a charity which aims to increase the emotional wellbeing of children, parents, families, schools, and workplaces.

The charity delivers The Nurturing Programme, a course which trains health and social care services, third sector organisation, schools, and universities to be come more emotionally healthy. The programme's purpose is to build resilience; increase empathy; boost self-esteem; and help people sustain positive relatinships.

Beacon Awards

Jack Petchey CBE

Eighty-nine-year-old Jack Petchey CBE is an investor in young people. Born and brought up in the East End of London, Petchey became one of the most successful businessmen in Britain through car and property sales, and is now one of its most ardent philanthropists. Through the Jack Petchey Foundation, formed in 1999, he will have invested over £100m in young people by the end of 2015. His mission is to promote innovative youth programmes that instil a sense of self-belief in youngsters to help them take advantage of opportunities and play a full part in society. It is founded on the mantra: “If I think I can, I can.”

“I have gained a lot from life, a lot of experience and a lot of material things and I wanted to give something back to society. I think it is all our responsibility to give something back, whatever our position in life; we can always help others in some way. I tell this to the young people too – they can make a vast difference by supporting others and I believe they will gain more than they give!”

Petchey is the life force of the foundation, providing leadership, inspiring and motivating people aged between 11 and 25, and showing them they can make a difference and improve their lives. The foundation was established to engage more creatively with charities and strive for good practice in its decision-making. “There is more to philanthropy than just giving money to good causes. It helps the charities to sharpen their practice if you get them to think about what they are trying to achieve and ask questions to help them achieve that more effectively. In this way we get a relationship with the charities and can help by bringing our expertise from the business world too. We are concerned with measurable impact – you have to know the difference you make,” explains Petchey.

The three largest youth programmes are the Jack Petchey Achievement Awards that gets £2.6m into 2,000 grassroots youth organisations and schools every year, in order to recognise and reward young people’s achievements. “Awardees are chosen by their peers and the £200 award they receive has to be invested in their youth organisation – so they get a sense of philanthropy too,” says Petchey. Jack Petchey’s Speak Out Challenge trains almost 20,000 15-year-olds in public speaking each year raising their confidence, self-esteem and ability to communicate. “It is magical to see how this helps them develop,” says Petchey.

Step into Dance offers professional weekly dance training after school to almost 6,000 young people who otherwise would not have the opportunity. Young men on the verge of exclusion from schools, young people with disabilities, have all learnt team work, discipline and found a way to express themselves publicly through dance. Among numerous other charitable schemes, in 2006 the Petchey Academy that specialises in health, care and medical sciences was established in Hackney with a £2m contribution from the foundation which enjoys a close relationship as sponsor.

“In giving locally, you have to be a realist – you can’t do everything and solve the problems of the world, but that doesn’t mean you can’t do anything,” says Petchey.

Beacon Awards

Leah Pattison

Leah Pattison was recognised for her innovative approach to helping disadvantaged women in India. Leah is the co-founder of Women In Need, a charity which aims to help women suffering from illnesses such as HIV, leprosy, and cancer; and have been rejected by their families and communities as a result.

Women In Need provides treatment for the women, as well as raising awareness of the illnesses - desperately needed in communities where there is a lack of education, and stigma attached to these illnesses.

Leah's inspiration for Women In Need began when she first visited India in 1995. Leah herself contracted leprosy, and was fortunate to receive support from her family back home, and a woman named Usha. Seeing the plight of many women in India who were ostracised and discriminated against due to having leprosy, together, Leah and Usha founded Women In Need.

Beacon Awards

Rita Patel

Rita Patel was awarded the Beacon Prize for England in 2006. She worked extensively to provide education and support for Asian women in Leicester. The women who benefitted from the programmes came from excluded communities, making it difficult for them to access traditional education.

The benefits of the education programmes went beyond qualifications and teaching - it also helped integrate Asian communities; challenge prejudices; and prevent exclusion. Rita's inspiration for this community project came from her desire to break down barriers. 

In 2005, Rita founded the Peepul Centre, a community centre based in Leicester, providing a range of services for people in the local area. Rita has since gone on to become a City Councillor for Leicester.

Beacon Awards

Sir Peter Lampl OBE

Through his charity the Sutton Trust, Sir Peter Lampl is levelling the playing field for tens of thousands of low and middle income young people across the UK, gaining them access to the best educational opportunities.

The Sutton Trust, founded in 1997 with Sir Peter’s own funds, has since shaped and guided the debate on social mobility in the UK. The trust has funded over 150 research studies but is primarily a ‘do tank’, initiating and supporting a wide range of programmes from early years through to access to the professions. Sir Peter’s ambition is to make the top 100 fee-charging, and also top performing day schools in Britain, open to bright children from non-privileged homes.

Believing private schools should adopt ‘needs blind’ admissions, taking the smartest local children and then means testing parents so only the more affluent pay the full fees, Sir Peter created a social experiment at independent Belvedere girls’ school in Liverpool. The seven year pilot, jointly funded by the Sutton Trust and the Girls’ Day School Trust, saw diversity rocket, with 30% of pupils on free places, 40% paying partial fees and 30% paying full fees. The first cohort achieved the school’s best ever examination results - among the best in Liverpool - with 99% of students achieving at least five good GCSEs.

Sir Peter’s first intervention after founding the trust was the creation of the Oxford Summer School. It gave bright 17-year-olds from families where no one has been to university the opportunity to spend a week at Oxford experiencing university life. The programme is now running in 10 top British universities as well as Yale and MIT in the US. A report published by the trust in 2012, showed that summer school attendees were significantly more likely to get into a highly competitive university than children with similar academic profiles who hadn’t attended.

Many others programmes have followed addressing access at all levels; from engaging parents of young children in their development to helping GCSE students make better subject choices to increase their chances of university acceptance, and creating supported pathways for non- stereotypical candidates into the legal, medical and property professions. “It’s about levelling the playing field and making sure we don’t waste talent,” says Sir Peter.

The trust has been particularly influential through its policy shaping research. In 2005, a study conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, revealed that the gap in opportunities between the rich and poor was getting wider. It is a fact that has led government to act to address social immobility.

Sir Peter is chairman of the Education Endowment Foundation set up in 2011 by the Sutton Trust with support from Impetus Trust and funded by an endowment of £125m from the government to improve the performance of the poorest children in the worst performing schools. Sir Peter says: “Giving should be hard-headed: you do nobody any favours giving without being clear your money is having a real impact.”

Beacon Awards

Kerryanne Jacobsen-Okezie

Kerryanne was awarded the Beacon Prize for Wales in 2006. She was recognised for her leadership of the community-led regeneration programme in Newport, South Wales, as well as for her work and commitment to family learning in her local community.

Beacon Awards

Bill Holroyd

A sense of frustration led Cheshire businessman Bill Holroyd to take an outstanding Bolton youth club and scale it up as charity OnSide Youth Zones, now serving around 20,000 youngsters across the North West of England. Holroyd, who has developed more than 25 companies in the last 15 years, says: “I was frustrated that here was a fantastic youth club with 21st century facilities that everybody wanted to see expanded to other areas and yet no one was doing anything. I felt I had the contacts and skills to do it.”

Holroyd says he was ‘deep-ended’ when he was first asked to be Chairman of the Bolton Lads and Girls Club. “When I walked through the doors I was struck by two things; firstly, it was full of the sort of children that scare the living daylights out of you and you walk across the road to avoid; secondly, how happy kids are when they are in the right environment.” “It was staggering. There was no compromise: the facilities were excellent and I thought ‘why doesn’t every child have this?’”

Holroyd’s aim is to build 100, 21st century youth centres across the UK, giving young people quality, safe and affordable places to go in their leisure time. There are currently six OnSide Youth Zone centres across the north including Manchester, Blackburn, Oldham, Wigan and Carlisle. Each centre costs £6m to build and £1m a year to run. Around 50% of running costs are donated by the local community and grants with the rest coming from income raised from the yearly £5 membership fees and 50p entry cost, and from local authority funding. The impact of the centres is profound: in each area that an OnSide Youth Zone centre has opened, local youth- related crime and anti-social behaviour has fallen by 50% says Holroyd.

Two years ago the charity launched a mentoring programme aimed at addressing the NEET (people not in education, employment or training) issue. Mentors support young people in their first few years of work when they are vulnerable and most likely to quit.

In its first year 200 young people were supported, 430 in the following year and the aim is to support 800 newly- employed young people in 2015. With mentoring support more than 80% have remained in employment. Holroyd urges others to “chuck themselves in at the deep end” and give back to their communities. “I am glad I did. Some days you feel you are bashing your head against a brick wall but seeing those kids happy is worth it. It is overwhelming in all senses. What is particularly rewarding is seeing communities solve their own problems. When they do, they care more about them. It’s a whole different game. We have 1000 volunteers across our centres and a waiting list of 100. The centres are prized venues.”

Holroyd says OnSide Youth Zones shows the ‘gearing effect of philanthropy’. “Philanthropists can lead the charge and unlock the amazing power in a community.”

Beacon Awards

Claire Hicks MBE

Claire Hicks won the award for Family Philanthropy in 2007's Beacon Awards. She is the Founding Director and first Chief Executive of IMPACT UK.

IMPACT describes their aims as 'Improving health, preventing disability'. Working worldwide, IMPACT delivers programmes which prevent and alleivate disabilities. Projects are run by lcoals, who have the best understanding of healthcare needs within their communities. IMPACT have helped restored sight, mobility, and hearing, as well as reparing cleft lips for almost 800,000 people.

Beacon Awards

The RT. Hon Lord Harris of Peckham & Lady Harris DBE DL

A simple belief that children should have the best possible start in life and a good education underpins Lord Philip and Lady Pauline Harris’ long commitment to foetal medicine and to the Academy school movement.

Since the mid 70s the Harris family has committed 20% of their wealth to philanthropy and raised hundreds of millions of pounds for various causes, including disability, cancer (funding the country’s first breast cancer scanner at Paddington Hospital) and end of life care through the Harris Hospice in Orpington.

The relationship between Wellbeing of Women (previously Birthright) and Lord and Lady Harris spans over thirty years. Through it, they have touched hundreds of thousands of families around the world.

In the mid 80s the Harris Birthright centre for foetal medicine was founded at King’s College Hospital, London. It is now a leading clinical unit and research centre for the assessment and treatment of unborn babies, caring for more than 10,000 patients each year.

Four more Harris Birthright centres quickly followed, including St Mary’s, known as the ‘Save the Baby Unit’ and the largest clinic of its kind in the world. It offers hope to over 1000 couples every year who give birth to healthy live babies who would not otherwise exist.

The other Harris Birthright Centres are Oxford’s Pre-Eclampsia Research Centre; Sheffield’s Centre for Reproductive Medicine and Aberdeen’s Centre for the Prevention of Cervical Cancer. Another centre dedicated to pre-term research is due to open imminently in Liverpool.

Alongside money, Lord Harris has applied the ‘people management’ skills on which his successful carpet empires were founded, to turn failing organisations into successes. By applying “discipline, inspirational leadership and by motivating teachers” more than 35 under-peforming schools around London have been turned into high- performing academies.

As chairman of Guy’s and Lewisham Hospitals from 1992 to 1995 Lord Harris reduced costs by 20% while serving 60,000 more patients each year. “It’s the achievement of which I am most proud. We established nurse banks made up of part-time returners to work instead of using expensive agency nurses, introduced a creche and a matron, and each ward sister had £2,500 to spend on small equipment of their choosing every six months instead of the hospital administration buying it for them.”

The Harris’ own praise is for the people ‘on the frontline’; “the volunteers that make it happen,” says Lord Harris. “Time is more important than money. I am in the background and yes I give money, but those armies of volunteers who give their time are fantastic.”

Lord and Lady Harris’ philanthropy touches people from the womb to end of life: “We call them our family,” says Lord Harris.

Beacon Awards

David Harding and Claudia Harding

Problem-solving and risk-taking has earned David Harding a fortune as a fund manager; he is now risking what he calls “a reasonable” multi-million pound sum of it to try to solve some of the world’s most pressing problems. By using maths to beat the financial markets, Winton Capital, founded by Harding in 1997, now Winton Global Investment Management, has become one of the world’s largest hedge funds. Previous to that Harding co-founded alternative investment fund Adam, Harding and Lueck, which is still the cornerstone of the FTSE listed Man Group. In his philanthropic work Harding is committed to the notion of risk and the application of data, mathematics and science to address issues around sustainability, disease and much more besides through The Winton Charitable Foundation and the David and Claudia Harding Foundation, established in 2005 and 2007 respectively. “Maths sounds terribly dry but actually contributes to making life better.

Though failure is painful, if I don’t have some donations that are not successful, then I am not taking enough risk. It is something you have to take on board; you cannot have a 100% success rate,” says Harding.

In 2006 the Winton Charitable Foundation endowed a Chair in the Public Understanding of Risk at Cambridge University. Harding is an alumnus, graduating from Cambridge in 1982 with a first class honours degree in natural sciences specialising in theoretical physics.

He became the patron of the Harding Center for Risk Literacy at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin which opened in 2009. In February 2011 Harding sponsored the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books for the next five years that celebrates the best new popular science writing for a general adult readership. Though Harding denies a passion for anything other than his wife and children, an emotional connection with Cambridge University and also his Oxford home has been a motivator for donations.

He has sponsored the Winton Institute for Monetary History at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and recently set up a £600k fund through the Oxfordshire Community Foundation.

In 2011 Harding pledged £20m to establish the Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability at the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University. The research programme applies physics to meet the growing demands on the earth’s natural resources.

This work aims to revolutionise energy consumption, such as creating new kinds of batteries. Its quest is to find a missing molecule that will turn sunlight directly into energy in a way that is cheap and sustainable enough to be a real alternative power source. “We need to find the equivalent of silicon technology for energy; that would really crack the problem,” says Harding.

In 2012 Harding joined the Create the Change Campaign board, which was created by Cancer Research UK and tasked with raising over £100m for The Francis Crick Institute, the largest biomedical research centre in Europe. Harding’s donation of £5m will fund a bioinformatics department, applying computer science, mathematics, and information theory to organise and analyse complex genetic data in the fight against cancer.

With the aim of inspiring a new generation to love numbers, in 2014 Harding made a £5m gift to the Science Museum to fund a new maths gallery that will explore the complex ideas of mathematicians since the turn of the 17th century. The gallery, to be named after Harding, is predicted to cost £7.5m in total and will open in 2016. Harding says: “Maths has never had a great image in our society. If we can do anything to make people more excited then it’s got to be a step in the right direction. I think they can create something really nice and hopefully influence the next generation of school kids to be less maths averse. If you have more training in maths it can only help your life.” Science Museum director Ian Blatchford describes History at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and recently set up a £600k fund through the Oxfordshire Community Foundation. In 2011 Harding pledged £20m to establish the Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability at the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University. The research programme applies physics to meet the growing demands on the earth’s natural resources.

This work aims to revolutionise energy consumption, such as creating new kinds of batteries. Its quest is to find a missing molecule that will turn sunlight directly into energy in a way that is cheap and sustainable enough to be a real alternative power source. “We need to find the equivalent of silicon technology for energy; that would really crack the problem,” says Harding. In 2012 Harding joined the Create the Change Campaign board, which was created by Cancer Research UK and tasked with raising over £100m for The Francis Crick Institute, the largest biomedical research centre in Europe. Harding’s donation of £5m will fund a bioinformatics department, applying computer science, mathematics, and information theory to organise and analyse complex genetic data in the fight against cancer.

With the aim of inspiring a new generation to love numbers, in 2014 Harding made a £5m gift to the Science Museum to fund a new maths gallery that will explore the complex ideas of mathematicians since the turn of the 17th century. The gallery, to be named after Harding, is predicted to cost £7.5m in total and will open in 2016. Harding says: “Maths has never had a great image in our society. If we can do anything to make people more excited then it’s got to be a step in the right direction. I think they can create something really nice and hopefully influence the next generation of school kids to be less maths averse. If you have more training in maths it can only help your life.” Science Museum director Ian Blatchford describes it as a “game-changing gift that will inspire further transformational philanthropy”.

Harding says of his philanthropy: “Giving money has been surprisingly satisfactory; you meet people you wouldn’t meet and enjoy experiences you wouldn’t have otherwise enjoyed.”

In terms of personal reward he says one of his most enjoyable experiences pound for pound was funding ‘a lovely man’ to fulfil a deeply held passion to excavate an architectural site in Turkey. It led to the unearthing of a lost language and a 3,500-year-old letter written by a soldier under siege as he abandoned his post. “For £10k that was satisfactory and very classy. The point is it shows your best philanthropy doesn’t have to be your biggest philanthropy.”

Beacon Awards

Paul Hardie

Paul Hardie was award the Beacon Prize for Scotland for his dedication to helping the development of young people in Arbroath, Scotland.

Paul was recoingsed for his work with the CAFE project, which stands for Community Alcohol Free Environment. It aims to provide a safe environment for young people to attend, and hosts a range of activities and clubs. Paul was 16 when he joined CAFE, where he served as a member of the youth committee. 

Nationally, Paul has worked with the Scottish Executive and the UK parliament to inform policies about drugs, alcohol, health, and physical activity.

Beacon Awards

Janet Hannay

Janet Hannay was awarded the Beacon Prize for Scotland in 2007 for her support, friendship and practical help to parents with young children in local communities.

Janet is central to the creation of Home-Start Wigtownshire which supports families. The team recruit and train volunteers to visit families at home to offer informal, friendly and confidential support.

Beacon Awards

Sir Paul Getty

Sir Paul Getty is widely considered to be one of the most generous philanthropists the UK has ever seen. His philanthropic giving has totaled to over £100 million. But it is not the amount of giving which made Sir Paul Getty deserving of the Special Posthumous Prize in 2003 - but rather, the value in his giving.

Sir Paul was known for his contributions to art and cultural projects. He donated £50 million to the National Gallery, and £2 million to the Imperial War Museum. He also gave £5 million to the restoration of the West Front of St Paul's Cathedral - demonstrating his dedication to supporting well-known cultural institutions.

Beacon Awards

Vikki George

Vikki George is the founder of Postpals, a charity which allows people to sign-up, and then send cards and gifts to seriously or terminally-ill children and their siblings.

Vikki has ME (mylagic encephalmyelitis), which is a condition which causes persistent fatigue which cannot be relieved through sleep or rest. During a particularly severe bout of illness, Vikki found inspiration for setting up her organisation. She found that receiving cards in the post lifted her spirits are being bedbound and isolated.

Postpals is now supported by the Prince's Trust; Children in Need; and The Queen's Award. Its patron is TV presenter Fearne Cotton. Children aged 3-17 across the UK can receive emails, gifts, or cards.

Vikki was awarded the Young Philanthropist Beacon Prize in 2008 in recognition of her charitable work.

Beacon Awards

Sarah Francis

Sarah Francis was just 15 years old when she was awarded the Beacon Prize in the Young Philanthropist category in 2004. 

Sarah was awarded the prize due to her work in raising awareness of the plight of Afghan refugees in Pakistan. Sarah's charitable work stood out through the medium in which her charitable actions were delivered - through music. Sarah recorded a song called 'Voice of Freedom', and proceeds from concert tickets, CD, and calendar sales were donated to charity.

In a year, Sarah raised over £12,000, which was donated to the President's Relief Fund for Afghan Refugees. 

Beacon Awards

Niall Fitzduff

In 2004, Niall Fitzduff was awarded the Beacon national prize for Northern Ireland. 

His extensive charitable activity ranges from promoting volunteering opportunities, bringing together local communities, as well as carrying out his own fundraising activities.

Beacon Awards

Nicholas Ferguson CBE & Jane Ferguson

 

Nick Ferguson CBE and Jane Ferguson were both awarded the Beacon Prize for Place-based Philanthropy in 2013. Nick is a British businessman, and is currently the Chairman of BskyB. A strong believe that philanthropy is key to a healthy society, Nick founded the Kilfinan Trust, which is linked closely to his personal experiences. The trust donates to organisations which his family members are involved in. For example, the Turst has supported West London Action for Children, where his wife, Jane, is the Chairman. 

The Trust has also funded scholarships to twelve students from the area of Argyll, Scotland, to attend the prestigious University of Edinburgh. 

Aside from philanthropy, Nick's charitable activity has extended to setting up a mentoring group for Chief Executives of UK charities, called the Kilfinan Group.

Beacon Awards

Ben Drew, Plan B

Award-winning rap artist, songwriter, actor, producer and director Ben Drew is laying the foundations for a different society. One that challenges a system that measures success only by academic qualifications and alienates young people who are unable to gain them. “Kids who are not academically gifted are told they are failures. They believe it, become disruptive get expelled. They end up on the block, smoking weed and doing crime. They are alienated from society,” says Drew, who speaks from experience. Drew ended his school career in Tunmarsh pupil referral unit (PRU) in Newham, for children considered ‘unteachable’ in mainstream education.

Drew’s route out of what he calls a “vicious circle” came when he found music. “There was an inspirational music teacher at Tunmarsh called Cliff Early who had the patience and motivation to work with kids like me. He gave me the confidence and belief in myself to pursue a career in music,” says Drew. Drew has gone on to win more than 20 top music awards, write two number one albums and produce, direct and co-score the film Ill Manors that tells the story of gang life on the Forest Gate estate where he grew up. Now as a successful artist he refuses to turn his back on the streets that were his muse and the estate kids whose talents he says are being wasted.
Spurred into action by the 2011 London riots and looting sprees he began to think about how he could change things. “These kids weren’t useless. They knew how to deal drugs, they were organised enough to commit crimes. What I also saw is that they all took great pride in their appearance, especially their hair. I thought if I could teach them how to cut hair I could give them a skill that they could use for life.”

Discussions with friends led him to Andrew Curtis and the Hair Project near Shoreditch. Curtis is a gifted Vidal Sassoon trained hairstylist who rejected an industry career to teach kids how to cut hair to the highest standards in a state-of-the-art salon. “When I met him he was living in the salon because he had run out of money.” Drew funded him to carry on his work and is helping The Hair Project become a sustainable organisation that takes kids from two East London PRU’s, training them for industry. And so Drew’s charity Each One, Teach One (EOTO) was born in 2012. He describes it as the ‘University of Alternative Learning’. Drew has invested hundreds of thousands of pounds to bring together like-minded people and create sustainable organisations committed to creating opportunities and enabling positive long-term changes in the lives of young people.

EOTO works with projects that invest in kids with creative vocational skills. They are currently running hairdressing, video-production, and music and drama projects, but are looking to expand their range of subjects to cover as many creative and vocational career paths as possible. The key to success says Drew is enhancing young people’s emotional intelligence through mentoring. “Mentoring is the glue. Without mentoring the rest would be a waste of time. We are mobilising the people who care and understand the problem to create a new society - one that young people understand and can be a part of,” says Drew.



Beacon Awards

Gill Donovan

Gill Donovan is the director of patient services with Cancer Care Cymru (CCC), and was awarded the Welsh national prize in the Beacon Awards 2007.

Her outstanding contribution to charitable causes includes heading up a team of specialist nurses for the charity she set up. Gill developed one of the UK's first nurse-led chemotherapy clinics and set up a helpline for cancer patients. 

Beacon Awards

Michael de Giorgio

Mike de Giorgio is the Chief Executive of Greenhouse, a charity working to promote sports and sport education among disadvantaged young people in the UK. Set up in 2002, Mike created a sports coaching pilot for young people living in a local housing estate.

Identifying the need to bring sports to young people living in less privileged areas, in 2004, Greenhouse delivered their sports programmes to schools. Table tennis programmes were brought to schools in inner-city areas of London, before merging with Bethwin Community Football Club in 2005.

Beacon Awards

Dr Samarendra Das

Samarendra Das is a opthalmologist based in the UK. He has also devoted several years to supporting Rotary Clubs, by setting up hospitals. Over 20,000 surgeries were being performed, free of charge, by various Rotary Clubs through these hospitals. Over 40,000 people every year had their eyesight restored through the treatment of cataract blindness.

Samarendra was awarded a Beacon Prize for Leadership in 2007 for establishing hospitals and healthcare clinics, specialising in eye health, in India. 

Beacon Awards

Francesca D’Arcy

Francesca D'Arcy was awarded the Judges Special Award at the Beacon Awards in 2005. The prize was presented by David Miliband. Francesca was awarded for her extensive volunteering efforts at a young age. Since she was 10, Francesca has raised money for various charities. At the time Francesca was awarded a prize, Francesca had raised a staggering £50,000 for charitable causes, including Marie Curie Cancer Research. 

Francesca has also organised several pioneering fundraising initiatives, bringing together business, local churches, and the media within her community.

Beacon Awards

David Constantine MBE

 

David Constantine MBE was awarded the Beacon Prize for Courage in 2003. He is the co-founder of the charity Motivation. The charity campaigns for 'Freedom through mobility' by providing specialist wheelchairs to disabled people across the world. Their goal is not just to mobilise people physically; but also increase their confidence and help them feel included in society.

Beacon Awards

Graham Clempson and Pilotlight

 

When ‘just writing cheques for charity’ began to pall, investment banker and private equity specialist Graham Clempson started to look for a more meaningful way to give and a way to add balance to his career.

In 2002, through his involvement with the City Giving Initiative, he met Fiona Halton, the CEO of Pilotlight, a then newly-launched mentoring charity that connects time-poor senior business leaders to support charities in a sustainable way.

At the time, Pilotlight had a small budget, a handful of volunteers and was working with five charities. Halton invited Clempson to meet some charities. He was at first unsure of what he might offer: “When I asked the people running the charity what they did or why they did it, they were articulate and full of passion. When I asked them how they measured their success, or how they planned to survive and grow they stumbled – I immediately saw that the everyday business skills that I took for granted could be extremely helpful for these charities; potentially more helpful than just giving them money. So I became a Pilotlighter and have not looked back.” As a Pilotlighter, Clempson gave a fixed donation and his time to mentor partner charities. It soon became clear to Clempson that Pilotlight needed to develop more standardised processes and procedures in order to build its own capacity to support more charities. Clempson funded the development of a “tactical toolkit” to frame the mentoring process, as the first iteration of what is now the Pilotlight programme.

In 2006 Clempson joined the Pilotlight board as a trustee and made a significant multi-year funding commitment providing the group with a strong and sustained financial base, attracting additional donor support. He also underwrote the salary of Pilotlight’s first evaluation manager being a firm believer in “what you can’t measure, you can’t manage”.

In 2013 Clempson agreed to take over as Chair – but not before Pilotlight had become fully sustainable. “I wanted to be sure Pilotlight could stand on its own two feet financially before becoming Chairman, as I didn’t want people to feel that we couldn’t have open debate at trustee meetings while I was a funder.” With Clempson’s involvement and leadership, Pilotlight has evolved into a national charity that has now worked with over 1000 senior business leaders, and 400 charitable organisations across the UK.

It works with hundreds of volunteers, has a large and diverse funding base, a strong and committed board and an annual operating budget of £1.3m per year. Pilotlight continues to grow with a full-time staff of more than 20 people and offices in London and Edinburgh. Clempson says of his journey with Pilotlight: “When I decided to give I thought I would be giving financially.

In fact, I started by giving time and skills and a small amount of money, and as confidence in what I was giving to increased, so did my financial donations.” Speaking of what he is most proud Clempson says: “Helping create a sustainable organisation that I know will be around for many years. It is also a wonderful accolade that some of the smartest brains in philanthropy, such as The Garfield Weston Foundation, are choosing to work with us and that we are helping people donate their skills at the start of their career through the RBS graduate programme.”

Gillian Murray, Pilotlight’s chief executive says: “Apart from being a resolute champion of Pilotlight, the best thing about Graham from my perspective is the business experience and focus he brings to his role as Chairman. He is supportive and challenging, never letting us forget that if we are to help make our partner charities thrive, we must work hard to demonstrate that Pilotlight itself is a model of sustainability.”

Beacon Awards

Zakwan Chowdhury

Zakwan was awarded a Beacon Prize in 2007 for his tireless anti-bullying efforts. Setting up the Anti Bullying Massif, Zakwan helped change the perception and attitudes towards bullying in schools across the UK.

Initially, the anti-bullying programme began with Central Foundatoin School, who trained with Youth Act to help deliver and present the programme. Following the success of the his school's anti-bullying programme, Zakwan expanded the campaign across the UK, and overseas.

Zakwan went on to work for IPowerI, a non-profit organisation that attempts to peace, tackle violence, resolve conflict and bullying while empowering young people.

Beacon Awards

Jamie Carragher

Retired international and Liverpool number 23 Jamie Carragher is a role model to young people and fellow footballers. With money from his testimonial game in 2009 he created the 23 Foundation through the Community Foundation for Merseyside. It reached its £1m target for an endowment fund in February 2010, with match funding from the Grassroots Endowment Challenge from central government.

“I always intended the money from the game to go to charity, but setting up a foundation means it can have impact and for a longer time,” says Carragher. The 23 Foundation provides grants and support to young people in local communities. It encourages the youth of Merseyside to actively reach for their dreams by following their sporting interests. It has distributed £308,041 in grants to support 20 individuals and 55 community groups across Merseyside. 2013 saw a successful partnership between the 23 Foundation and Merseyside YouthBank, a youth-led grant- maker and decision-maker. The 23 Foundation provided £5,000 for YouthBank’s young panellists to distribute to local children and young people’s projects that they felt would make a positive difference to their communities. Projects included sports coaching courses, intergene- rational activities and play schemes to encourage local children to enjoy outdoor activities.

The culmination of this work was an event, held at Café Sports England, where YouthBank members presented certificates alongside Carragher to the young people representing their community projects.

“Being involved is a big part of what we are aiming to achieve. I hope that I can give youngsters a lift and that extra push to realise their goals. Liverpool is a place that likes to see its own do well. It is a tight knit community and growing up I got a lot of help and encouragement from people around me. Now I am in a fortunate position and able to give back it feels right to do that,” says Carragher.

The 23 Foundation has established a 23 Foundation Soccer School for young people from the Sefton area of Merseyside where Carragher comes from. It works with six schools in deprived areas of Sefton as part of a reward scheme for young people delivering high quality football coaching sessions to boys and girls from ages five to 16. The Mayor of Liverpool supported the extension of the scheme to eight schools in deprived areas of Liverpool.

As well as inspiring Merseyside’s youth, Carragher is sharing his giving experience with other footballers interested in taking a strategic approach to philanthropy.

Carragher has been instrumental in setting up a partnership between UK Community Foundations and the PFA to offer charitable giving options to players via community foundations. It is hoped to lead to other philanthropists from football engaging with giving in communities across the country.

Carragher says he is honoured to be recognised for his philanthropy: “I am pleased but it is more about doing charity well. Everybody involved in charity deserves recognition.”

Beacon Awards

Dr Peter Carey

Dr Peter Carey was awarded the Beacon Prize for Leadership in 2008. He is the co-founder of the Cambodia Trust. The Cambodia Trust is a disability rights charity, advocating for an inclusive, barrier-free society. The charity was established after Prime Minister of Cambodia, Hun Sen, asked for assistance for the thousands of landmine survivors in the country.

The trust provides orthotics and prosthetics to disabled people. The Cambodia Trust - now renamed Exceed - has since established schools of prosthetics and orthotics in five countries across Southeast Asia.

Dr Carey is was previously a Laithwaite Fellow and Tutor in Modern History at Trinity College, University of Oxford Trinity College from 1979-2008, when he retired.

Beacon Awards

Reverend William Broad

Reverend Bill Broad was the founded of the Cirdan Sailing Trust. Founded in 1983, the trust was set up to encourage the development, team work and motivation of young people through off-shore sailing in groups.

The Cirdan Sailing Trust  helps disadvantaged young people across the UK with self-development, integration and learning opportunities through the challenge of life at sea aboard large sailing vessels.

Beacon Awards

Suzanne Biegel

 

By questioning the purpose of wealth, and the link between philanthropy and investing, Suzanne Biegel has become a passionate social investor, and a collaborative-woman- whirlwind catalysing social investment across the globe. “Beyond funding your lifestyle and deciding what is enough for you, I think you can say ‘what is it I am going to do through my work, philanthropy, investments,- everything I am a part of - that can fund the world in which I want to live,” says Biegel.

The native New Yorker began her journey to 100% impact in 2000, when she and her partner sold their e-learning and communications business and she set up a fund at the Liberty Hill Foundation whose board she later joined. At that time she was called ‘overly ambitious’ for her ideas on mission-related investment, and so began a quest to find fellow travellers “using both sides of their brain” when investing. Fifteen years on and Biegel has continually found those fellow travellers; she is currently one of a group of 40 or so investing for 100% impact, whose total portfolios across all asset classes are invested to create positive social change. Along the way Biegel has co-founded and spearheaded organisations across the world that challenge traditional investment thinking.

After moving to the UK five years ago, she joined ClearlySo, and set up Clearly Social Angels (CSA) – the UK’s first (and still largest) angel impact investing network. Under Biegel’s leadership, over £3.3m has been raised through CSA for 21 companies focused on social or environmental change – from Aduna, a superfood brand creating sustainable livelihoods in sub-Saharan Africa, to Insane Logic, which provides apps and games for people with learning and communications difficulties.

One of the organisations on whose boards she sits is Confluence Philanthropy, a membership organisation for foundations and trusts moving to mission-related investing. It has grown to several hundred members from across the US. Biegel co-founded the Values Based Investment group of Women Donors Network, in the US, and also founded Women in Social Finance in London. Biegel’s own impact investing history is particularly focused on investing in women and girls, environmental sustainability and combating climate change. She speaks of ‘The Women Effect’ – the premium impact of investing in women and investment by women.

“This is not just about women and girls. It’s about diversity, and the evidence that diversity, whether it be on teams or inside portfolios, drives outperformance in portfolios,” says Biegel. “Whether you are using investment as a tool for social change, or just want to align your investments with your values, there are a lot of ways to engage. “

Her investment activities have given her a unique position in inspiring other philanthropists and investors to follow her lead. She is in demand globally as a speaker and writer on why and how impact is part of her criteria in her portfolio, and why she wants to recycle her money to do more good.

Beacon Awards

Paul Barry-Walsh

Paul Barry-Walsh was the recipient of the Beacon Prize for Creative Giving in 2008. Paul is the founder of the Fredericks Foundation, an organisation which helps people set up their own business; and support existing businesses who cannot gain financial help from their banks. 

The work of the Fredericks Foundation, set up in 2001, was especially vital during the economic downturn - resulting in an economic environment where finding employment or starting a business was more difficult. The foundation has helped people get off benefits and support themselves.

Paul comes from an corporate background, previously working for technology company IBM, and Safetynet, a provider of Business Continuity Services.

Beacon Awards
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Categories for Beacon Awards 2017

There are 10 award categories for the Beacon Awards 2017.

Beacon Award for Philanthropy

The Beacon Award for Philanthropy is the main category for individual philanthropists. More than one award will be made under this category.


In addition to the Beacon Award for Philanthropy we will also be presenting:

Beacon Award for City Philanthropy

This award celebrates the work of a philanthropist based in the City of London, Mayfair, or Canary Wharf. Their work will inspire the next generation of City philanthropists.

Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Arts & Culture

This award celebrates the work of an individual or a small group who has enriched society through their work in promoting arts, culture, and/or heritage.

Beacon Award for Impact Investment

This award recognises those who have addressed social, environmental or charitable concerns - while also generating a financial return.

Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropist and a Charity

When philanthropists and charities work together, it can inspire others to give well. This award celebrate excellent an excellent partnership between the two.

Beacon Trailblazer Award

The Trailblazer Award was introduced in 2015, and won by hip-hop artist Plan B. The award celebrate those who are early on in their philanthropic journey, yet have already made an impact.

Judges' Special Award

This award is for any prospective nominees who do not fit the above categories.


New categories for Beacon 2017

For the next Beacon Awards, three new categories have been introduced. These are:

Beacon Award for Innovation

Philanthropy can take place in many different forms - this award recognises those whose giving is pioneering or innovative.

Beacon Award for Local Community Philanthropy

Philanthropy occurs at all scales; this award celebrates philanthropy which has benefitted the community in a particular region.

Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Sport

This award will be given to an sportsperson, sporting family, or group of sports people who, through sporting activity, have delivered positive social change.


For more information on the categories, please read the nominations information pack here.

Beacon Awards

Dr Mohammed Amran

Dr Mohammed Amran was awarded the Beacon Prize for Community Builder for his efforts in alleviating tensions within his community. Raised in Bradford, England, Mohammed began his work after the riots in 1995, where he set up the Young People's Forum. The forum aimed to encourage dialogue between the police and young people, with the overall objective of conflict resolution between different communities.

Mohammed also became the Commissioner for the Commision for Racial Equality - the youngest person to hold the title.

More recently, Mohammed has been involved in equal rights campaigns, and mentors at a local school.

Beacon Awards

Jake Bonsall

Jake Bonsall volunteered in the community which he grew up in - Manor Estate, in Sheffield. He began volunteering aged 11, working to raise the profile of young people living in the estate. 

In 2004, Jake was awarded the Beacon Prize for Young Philanthropy. His work involves inspiring young people to be "leaders, not followers" - allowing them to gain their full potential, despite coming from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Beacon Awards
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Beacon Board

We hope that others will be inspired and encouraged to make their own contribution through the great stories of giving that emerge through the Beacon Awards.

Since 2010 the Beacon Awards have been managed by UK Community Foundations.

Beacon's Board



Gay Huey-Evans - Chair of Trustees

Gay Huey-Evans - Chair of Trustees

Gay Huey Evans is Deputy Chair of the Financial Reporting Council and serves on the Board of directors of Aviva plc, Conoco Phillips and Itau BBA International plc.  Gay was formerly Vice Chairman of the board and non-executive chairman, Europe, of the International Swaps and Derivatives Association, Inc. (ISDA) (financial trade association). From April 2008 to October 2010 she was Vice Chairman, Investment Banking & Investment Management at Barclays Capital. Prior to that Gay was President of Tribeca Ltd and head of governance at Citi Alternative Investments (EMEA) and Director of the Markets Division at the Financial Services Authority between 1998-2005. She held various senior management positions with Bankers Trust Company in New York and London between 1984-1998). Gay is passionate about giving back and has been involved with various non-profit organisations.  She currently serves as a Trustee of Wellbeing Women, and previously, a Trustee of Wigmore Hall, co-opted Trustee of Tate, Trustee of Benjamin Frankin House and Bucknell University.


Paul Barry-Walsh

Paul Barry-Walsh

After leaving IBM in 1986, Paul Barry-Walsh founded Safetynet followed by Netstore in 1996. In 2001 he founded The Fredericks Foundation which has become one of the UK’s leading micro-finance organisations,  funding 2 disadvantaged individuals per week. Paul is involved in a number of start-ups, and was granted the Queens Award for Enterprise Promotion. In 2008 he received the Beacon Award for Creating Giving.  In 2009 he was given the CNBC/FT European Philanthropist of the Year Award, and won the Entrepreneur County Inaugural Award for the Entrepreneur’s Entrepreneur in 2011.


Matthew Bowcock CBE

Matthew Bowcock CBE

Matthew Bowcock is formerly the Chair of the Community Foundation Network. He is a serial entrepreneur who has been involved in founding technology and biotechnology companies in Australia, the US and the UK. He continues to be a non-executive director of early-stage companies but is increasingly involved in philanthropy. He runs the Hazelhurst Trust, a family charitable foundation, which has set up a fund within the Surrey Community Foundation as he believes that giving is most effective when it is locally and professionally managed. He is a trustee of the Surrey Community Foundation and assists wherever possible in donor development.


Anne Boyd

Anne Boyd

A barrister by profession, Anne Boyd has had many years experience of the criminal justice system including work in prisons, criminal courts and  alternatives to custody. Her voluntary sector experience has embraced conservation of marine stocks and she has also been Chair of the Scottish Community Foundation, Vice Chair of the Community Foundation Network, and the Chair of a Lottery fund. Among current commitments she is Chair of the Council of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust and the Pitlochry Festival Theatre.


Tracey Reddings

Tracey Reddings

Tracey Reddings is Managing Director and Head of UK Private Wealth Management at J.P. Morgan Private Bank. She has enjoyed a 25-year career as a banker spanning across the private, public and charitable sectors. Prior to joining J.P. Morgan, Tracey was Head of UK Private Banking at SG Hambros Bank Ltd and before that, she was Chief Executive of CAF Bank Ltd and CAF Marketing Services.  Over the years, Tracey has developed a strong track record and reputation for delivering innovation and building partnerships to create new business and enhance brand value; in 2007 she was awarded the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the Product Innovation category. Tracey is an MBA-holder and a Chartered Director; she is also a Fellow of both the Institute of Directors and the Chartered Management Institute, and a Freeman with the Guild of International Bankers. She is a trustee of the Surrey Community Foundation and Chairman of the British Bankers Association Wealth Management and Private Banking panel.


David Sheepshanks

David Sheepshanks

David assumed the Chair of UK Community Foundations in 2013 and has recently joined the board of the Beacon Awards. He has held a number of high profile board positions in business, sport and charity, including Chairman of Ipswich Town Football Club and Chairman of the Football League. Today he is Chairman of St George’s Park (The National Football Centre) and FA Learning, the educational arm of The FA responsible for Coach Education and Professional Development, and a Regional Chair of Coutts amongst a number of non-executive positions. He was the Founder and first Chair of The Ipswich Town Charitable Trust and one of the founding trustees for The Suffolk Community Foundation. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in 2004 by University of East Anglia for services to the community and made CBE in the 2012 New Year’s Honours List for services to Football and Suffolk Charity.

Beacon Awards
Kate Adie OBE DL hosts the 2015 Beacon Awards ceremony

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Beacon Awards
Speech given - side view of stage 2013

People at Beacon

The awards were set up in 2003 with the aim of promoting effective philanthropic giving through the creation of a nationally recognised awards scheme and a fellowship body of philanthropists to highlight best practice and innovation in philanthropy.

We hope that others will be inspired and encouraged to make their own contribution through the great stories of giving that emerge through the Beacon Awards.


UK Community Foundations

Since 2010, the Beacon Awards have been managed by UK Community Foundations (UKCF).

UKCF are a network of 46 Community Foundations across the UK. We provide advice and support to our member Community Foundations, and channel national-level funding to where it's needed most. In 2013-14, we awarded over 20,000 grants to a range of organisations and projects, making a real difference to local communities across the UK. Click here to find out more about the work we've done.


Beacon Board

Read more about the Beacon Board here.

Beacon Awards

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Beacon Awards

Beacon Awards 2015

Hosted by Kate Adie, the Beacon Awards 2015 celebrated the extraordinary and transformational achievements of individuals and families who have, each in their own various ways, brought about lasting social change through their conviction, their determination and their generosity. The awards celebrated their exploits with the hope of inspiring others to want to follow suit.

They highlighted key trends in philanthropic giving and pioneering developments, including the growing trend for donations of money together with time, expertise and social capital to support initiatives all around the UK.

The awards were supported by J.P. Morgan Private Bank, the City of London Corporation’s charity, City Bridge Trust and Pears Foundation.

Collectively, the 17 Beacon Fellows have donated over £300million to philanthropic causes, across a mix of local and global organisations, large institutions and grassroots charities.

The award winners have impacted hundreds of thousands of lives. Many focused on helping young people including creating state of the art youth clubs, building support networks to prevent children being put into care, helping improve social mobility, confidence and self-esteem. Others have created powerful partnerships between the charity sector and the business world and between philanthropists and local authorities.

Gay Huey Evans, Chair of the Beacon Awards said: “The 2015 Beacon Award winners are exceptional people who have given their time, expertise and financial resources to help people and communities prosper in difficult times. Philanthropy plays a vital role in providing resources to many organisations that keep our communities strong and the Beacon Award winners are outstanding examples of individuals whose giving is having a lasting impact on people’s lives. I know that the Beacon Award winners will inspire others to give and I look forward to sharing the lessons that can be learned from the inspirational example they set.”

Full list of winners

Honorary Beacon Fellowship

Trevor Pears CMG

Beacon Award for Philanthropy

Jamie Carragher

Lord and Lady Harris DBE DL

Bill Holroyd CBE DL

Sir Peter Lampl OBE

Jack Petchey CBE

Sir Peter Vardy DL and Lady Margaret Vardy

Sir Ian Wood CBE and Lady Helen Wood

Beacon Award for Cultural Philanthropy

Jonathan Moulds CBE

Beacon Award for Impact Investment

Suzanne Biegel

Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropist and a Charity

Graham Clempson and Pilotlight

Beacon Award for City Philanthropy

David and Claudia Harding

Beacon Trailblazer Award

Ben Drew aka Plan B

On 27th January 2015, Beacon held a reception for many of our 2015 nominees. The event included an interview with Beacon Fellows Paul Marshall and Marcelle Speller.

Beacon Awards
Sheepshanks et al clapping at tables

Beacon Awards 2017

On 9th May 2017, philanthropists from the worlds of finance, sport, and arts gathered at the Mansion House, London to celebrate inspiring examples of charitable giving.

Powering philanthropy

The Beacon Awards 2017 are about powering philanthropy. The awards are about recognising, celebrating, and inspiring people to give charitably, and to do it well. Each Beacon prize is awarded to someone who is powering philanthropy in their own fields. 

The power of philanthropy

Philanthropy is more than just giving. For those on the receiving end, philanthropy makes a real and tangible difference to their lives. Whether it's lifting people out of poverty; encouraging disadvantaged people to get back into education; or building community relations, philanthropy is powerful.

Philanthropy can inspire others to give, or inspire them to make a positive step in their lives. 


10 Years of Beacon

The Beacon Awards in 2017 will be the 10th Beacon Awards. It’s a momentous occasion, and over the years, we’ve celebrated philanthropists from all backgrounds and fields. From footballers to financiers; from rappers to writers – we’re passionate about powering philanthropy, in all its forms.

The 10th Beacon Awards ceremony will have three new categories, to recognise philanthropy from areas which are traditionally overlooked. 

The new categories are:

  • Beacon Award for Local Community Philanthropy
  • Beacon Award for Innovation
  • Beacon Award for Philanthropy in Sport

To read more about all the categories for Beacon 2017, click here.

Beacon Awards

Beacon Awards 2015

The 9th Beacon Awards in 2015 were held at the J.P. Morgan building, along London Embankment. The awards celebrated philanthropy from a range of fields and backgrounds.

Hosted by Kate Adie, the Beacon Awards 2015 celebrated the extraordinary and transformational achievements of individuals and families who have, each in their own various ways, brought about lasting social change through their conviction, their determination and their generosity. The awards celebrated their exploits with the hope of inspiring others to want to follow suit.

They highlighted key trends in philanthropic giving and pioneering developments, including the growing trend for donations of money together with time, expertise and social capital to support initiatives all around the UK.

The awards were supported by J.P. Morgan Private Bank, the City of London Corporation’s charity, City Bridge Trust and Pears Foundation.

Collectively, the 17 Beacon Fellows have donated over £300million to philanthropic causes, across a mix of local and global organisations, large institutions and grassroots charities.

The award winners have impacted hundreds of thousands of lives. Many focused on helping young people including creating state of the art youth clubs, building support networks to prevent children being put into care, helping improve social mobility, confidence and self-esteem. Others have created powerful partnerships between the charity sector and the business world and between philanthropists and local authorities.

Gay Huey Evans, Chair of the Beacon Awards said: “The 2015 Beacon Award winners are exceptional people who have given their time, expertise and financial resources to help people and communities prosper in difficult times. Philanthropy plays a vital role in providing resources to many organisations that keep our communities strong and the Beacon Award winners are outstanding examples of individuals whose giving is having a lasting impact on people’s lives. I know that the Beacon Award winners will inspire others to give and I look forward to sharing the lessons that can be learned from the inspirational example they set.”

Full list of winners

Honorary Beacon Fellowship

Trevor Pears CMG

 

Beacon Award for Philanthropy

Jamie Carragher

Lord and Lady Harris DBE DL

Bill Holroyd CBE DL

Sir Peter Lampl OBE

Jack Petchey CBE

Sir Peter Vardy DL and Lady Margaret Vardy

Sir Ian Wood CBE and Lady Helen Wood

 

Beacon Award for Cultural Philanthropy

Jonathan Moulds CBE

 

Beacon Award for Impact Investment

Suzanne Biegel

 

Beacon Award for an Outstanding Partnership Between a Philanthropist and a Charity

Graham Clempson and Pilotlight

 

Beacon Award for City Philanthropy

David and Claudia Harding

 

Beacon Trailblazer Award

Ben Drew aka Plan B

On 27th January 2015, Beacon held a reception for many of our 2015 nominees. The event included an interview with Beacon Fellows Paul Marshall and Marcelle Speller.

Beacon Awards

Philanthropy Footprints that Shape Society Today

To mark the launch of the 2015 awards, and to encourage nominations, Beacon is celebrating ten inspirational philanthropists from cities around the UK (many little known) to kick start debate about who has left a ‘philanthropy footprint’ that still affects society today and who is creating a ‘philanthropy footprint’ now.

Barney Hughes 1808-1878 (Belfast)

A business baker and pioneer impact investee who's bread alleviated hunger on an industrial scale.

Bernard Hughes, known as Barney, was born in Armagh. Having worked as a bakers’ boy for 6 years, in 1826 he moved to Belfast, and by 1870 he was recognised as the cities’ leading baker. As the owner of the largest baking enterprise in Ireland, his production supplied Belfast’s poorer population with much-needed cheap bread, particularly during the harsh years of the Great Famine. He gained the respect of the community as a municipal politician and industrial reformer, donating the ground for St Peter's Cathedral.

Current legacy: St Peter’s Cathedral is described today as ‘a landmark building’ in Belfast.

 

George Cadbury 1839 – 1922 (Birmingham)

The son of UK Chocolate and pioneer of responsible business practices

Everyone has heard of the Cadbury’s chocolate empire, but not many people know that the founder’s son, George Cadbury, was an important philanthropist in the 19th Century. George was driven by a passion for social reform, wanting to create clean and sanitary conditions for his workers in contrast to the usual grim reality of factories in Victorian Britain. He set new standards for living and working conditions and gave the Bourneville estate to the Bourneville Village Trust in 1901. The trust was founded to develop the local community and its surroundings.

Current legacy: The Bournville Village Trust is one of the largest and most respected housing trusts in the country specialising in development, communities, supported housing, special needs and urban regeneration.

 

Sir Montague Maurice Burton 1885 – 1952 (Leeds)

A clothing entrepreneur with an ethical edge 

A Lithuanian immigrant who arrived at the turn of the last century with just £100 to his name, Montague founded Burton, one of Britain's largest clothing shop chains. He started a tailoring business with the philanthropic aim of clothing the entire male population in good quality, affordable suits. Having enforced an unusually short working day for the time (8 hours) on his workforce, he was aware of the necessity to encourage wise and profitable use of spare time. He became one of the first to instil formal welfare provisions in the workplace, introducing food halls, leisure groups and activities such as theatre, dance and sports teams. He took an interest in maintaining the wellbeing of workers through health clinics and rest rooms. 

Current legacy:  Burton Clothing is still a successful British retailer. The company has worked closely with Cancer Research UK funding research into bowel cancer, and has supported the Movember Prostate Charity Campaign with the 'Burton' moustache, modeled on the moustache of their founder.

 

William Armstrong 1810 – 1900 (Newcastle)

A visionary engineer who saw that culture, history and identity matter

A visionary inventor, engineer, scientist and businessman, in his heyday William Armstrong employed over 25,000 people in the manufacture of hydraulic cranes, ships and armaments. Armstrong built Newcastle’s Swing Bridge and the hydraulic mechanism that operates London’s Tower Bridge. He also restored Bamburgh Castle on the Northumberland coast, often hailed as one of the most magnificent English castles to survive.  A prolific philanthropist, he founded Armstrong College (which evolved into Newcastle University), and gave funds to the Royal Victoria Infirmary as well as the Hancock Museum of Natural History (now the Great North Museum). 

Current legacy: Bamburgh castle described as 'the finest castle anywhere in this country' in Time Out Great Britain. The Great North museum has extensive collections and is a fantastic resource for teaching and research.

 

Edward Rushton 1756 – 1814 (Liverpool)

A poet who developed advocacy and campaigning as a tool for social change

A poet and slavery abolitionist, Edward Rushton was born in Liverpool in 1756. Whilst sailing with slave ships as a young man he became outraged at the appalling conditions he witnessed.  After an outbreak of the eye disease ophthalmia, Edward took food and water to the slaves which resulted in him losing his sight in his left eye and the damage of the right. As well as a career as an influential abolitionist, Rushton helped establish the Liverpool School for the Indigent Blind, the first of its kind in Britain, in 1791.

Current legacy: The Royal School for the Blind, Liverpool  is one of the leading schools of its kind today.

 

The Davies Sisters Gwendoline Davies (1882-1951) and Margaret Davies (1884-1963) (Cardiff)

Welsh sisters who pioneered music therapy and founded one of the UK's first music festivals

The Davies sisters, Gwendoline and Margaret, were two sisters from mid-Wales who will be remembered as dedicated patrons of the arts, bequeathing one of the great British art collections of the 20th century to the National Museum of Wales.  This is not all, however. Serving as Red Cross volunteers in World War One, Gwendoline and Margaret were so moved by the suffering they witnessed they resolved to establish an art and music centre for ex-soldiers. Gregynog Hall, the location of the centre, became the home to the annual Gregynog Music Festival, attracting musical luminaries such as Edward Elgar, Ralph Vaughan Williams and Gustav Holst.

Current legacy: The National Museum of Wales  houses Wales’s national archaeology, art, geology and natural history collections as well as major touring and temporary exhibitions. Gregynog festival is still going today 

 

Dame Cecily Saunders 1918 – 2005 (Barnet)

A founder of the modern hospice who revolutionised care for the terminally ill

Dame Cicely Saunders founded the modern hospice and started a worldwide movement to provide compassionate care for the terminally ill. A nurse, social worker and doctor, she developed what is now called palliative care, and the modern hospice. In 1948 she met a patient, David Tasma, a Polish-Jewish refugee who, having escaped from the Warsaw ghetto, was dying of cancer. He bequeathed her £500. This donation helped germinate the idea which would become St Christopher's, founded in 1967 and the beginning of the hospice movement. In 2002, Saunders co-founded a new charity, Cicely Saunders International. 

Current legacy: Cicely Saunders International St Christopher’s Hospice and the National Council for Palliative Care 

 

Edward Alleyn 1566–1626 (London)

An infamous actor of Shakespeare's time who created opportunities for others

Born in Bishopsgate, London, Edward Alleyn became widely known as one of the most accomplished actors of Shakespeare’s time. During his theatrical career he was the most famous of players, but is now little remembered. In his later life Alleyn turned away from the stage and towards philanthropy, founding a school. Alleyn’s bequest established clear principles by which the school should be governed, with an important attribute of the school being its favouring of ‘poor scholars’, so that children could access education irrespective of wealth or social background. 3 foundation schools are still supported by his legacy: Alleyns, James Allen's Girl's School and Dulwich College

Current legacy: the schools are very successful with strong philanthropic traditions upheld today, for example Dulwich 

 

William Alison 1790 – 1859 (Edinburgh)

A doctor who wanted to cure the establishment of its cruel indifference to poverty

William Alison was an eminent Scottish physician who argued that poverty’s link to disease was to do with circumstance and not sin. The ethos of the age dictated that poverty was due to indolence, and treatment should be withheld for the ‘healthy impoverished’. A man who was ahead of his time, Alison campaigned for the government to take a more active role in alleviating poverty, with his proposal of the Scottish Poor Law and his 1840 treatise Observations on the management of the poor. He lived to see a noticeable shift towards his call for tolerance and compassion. 

Current legacy: a key campaigner in changing social attitudes and an early pioneer of what would become the Welfare State and NHS

 

John Rylands 1801 – 1888 (Manchester)

A businessman whose gave locally and was concerned globally

The first multi-millionaire from Manchester, John Rylands owned the largest textile business in the UK, combining his aptitude for business with a social conscience. In the Borough of Stretford, where he resided at Longford Hall, he made considerable philanthropic donations to the town which included the founding of orphanages, homes for the elderly and the donation of a Town Hall. His huge gifts of money to aid the poor of Italy earned him the "Crown of Italy" honour from the Italian king, and his sizeable private book collection constituted the basis of the John Rylands Library. The Library was founded by his wife Enriqueta Rylands, a strong yet modest Victorian woman and an eminent philanthropist in her own right, who left the Library in memory of her late husband as a philanthropic gift to the city of Manchester.

Current legacy: The John Rylands library forms part of the university of Manchester’s library. Longford Hall is a Grade 2 listed building 

 

Beacon Awards

Dr Wendy Stephenson


Joint Award with John Pontin

Socially enlightened developer John Pontin OBE has created a literal ‘investment turbine’ that funds renewable sources of energy while generating financial returns to investors, provides a new form of economic power to India, and supports community projects in his home city of Bristol.

Pontin, who founded his multi-million pound business on fresh thinking, based the model on an original idea — that funding wind turbines in developing countries could generate additional benefits for communities at home and abroad.

John formed The Converging World charity in 2008, raising £1 million from his own resources and a similar amount from an Indian bank to fund two 1.5 megawatt turbines in an impoverished, rural area of Tamil Nadu. Power sold via the grid generates profit that funds local development work in India, environmental projects in the UK and reinvestment in more turbines.

With Wendy Stephenson as CEO, the charity raised money in 2012 for two further turbines, including nearly £200,000 from crowd funding. Investors receive 6% per annum return for a five-year loan.

The charity plans to build 200 megawatt of wind power over three to five years using debt and equity funding. The next tranche is for 25 megawatt turbines, which should generate £12 million for the charity over the 20-year life of the turbines.

Pontin and Stephenson are now building partnerships with like-minded charities and community foundations, sharing surplus from the turbines if these charities can help fund additional turbines.

Beacon Awards

John Pontin OBE

Joint Award with Wendy Stephenson

Socially enlightened developer John Pontin OBE has created a literal ‘investment turbine’ that funds renewable sources of energy while generating financial returns to investors, provides a new form of economic power to India, and supports community projects in his home city of Bristol.

Pontin, who founded his multi-million pound business on fresh thinking, based the model on an original idea — that funding wind turbines in developing countries could generate additional benefits for communities at home and abroad.

John formed The Converging World charity in 2008, raising £1 million from his own resources and a similar amount from an Indian bank to fund two 1.5 megawatt turbines in an impoverished, rural area of Tamil Nadu. Power sold via the grid generates profit that funds local development work in India, environmental projects in the UK and reinvestment in more turbines.

With Wendy Stephenson as CEO, the charity raised money in 2012 for two further turbines, including nearly £200,000 from crowd funding. Investors receive 6% per annum return for a five-year loan.

The charity plans to build 200 megawatt of wind power over three to five years using debt and equity funding. The next tranche is for 25 megawatt turbines, which should generate £12 million for the charity over the 20-year life of the turbines.

Pontin and Stephenson are now building partnerships with like-minded charities and community foundations, sharing surplus from the turbines if these charities can help fund additional turbines.

Beacon Awards

Michael McKibbin

Joint Award with Angila Chada

Michael McKibbin and Angila Chada share a common passion to see a stronger culture of philanthropy in Northern Ireland. They have become good friends through this ambition and through their willingness to act as ambassadors for the Community Foundation NI as fund holders, including attending events, meeting with prospective donors and making introductions. Crucially they have been willing to share their reasons for giving with the public through the press.

Their actions are not without risk.

One of the significant hurdles to developing local philanthropy, identified in a recent report, is the “cultural taboo against public philanthropy as it suggests ostentatious display of wealth. In Northern Ireland this is closely related to the history of the conflict and fearof ‘putting one’s head above the parapet’.”

In 2011, the Community Foundation NI hosted a ‘Philanthropy Week’ but found it difficult to persuade philanthropists to speak publicly. McKibbin however recognised the importance of doing so and also gave an interview to the Irish News about his family’s fund that supports children affected by illness or with special needs. His actions have inspired others to speak out about their own giving.

McKibbin’s fund, founded in memory of his parents in recognition of the positive upbringing they had provided, does not hold vast amounts of money, but allows the family to support four or five key projects each year, which he describes as “very rewarding, particularly when we see the results!”

Angila Chada, Chief Executive of Springboard, a young people’s peace-building charity in Belfast, also attended Philanthropy Week and was inspired to begin her own philanthropic journey. Chada was keen to illustrate that philanthropy isn’t exclusive to High Net Worth Individuals by setting up the Community Foundation’s first ever gradual growth endowment fund in January 2012 in honour of her parents who are able to share the joy of giving.
The Raj Darshna Foundation will support young people and the elderly in the community.

Chada describes its creation as the fulfilment of ‘a lifelong dream’. It became a reality after a visit to Auschwitz in 2009 when she was overwhelmed by a wish to give back. She feels she had an excellent upbringing and stable family home – but working in the community and voluntary sector, she knows that many local people have not been as fortunate.

As well as giving a portion of her wages each year she will be encouraging family and friends to invest for the benefit of others.

Chada has already given interviews to national and local press to explain why she feels it is important for others to consider how they could make a greater impact with their giving.

Beacon Awards

Angila Chada

Joint Award with Michael McKibbin

Michael McKibbin and Angila Chada share a common passion to see a stronger culture of philanthropy in Northern Ireland. They have become good friends through this ambition and through their willingness to act as ambassadors for the Community Foundation NI as fund holders, including attending events, meeting with prospective donors and making introductions. Crucially they have been willing to share their reasons for giving with the public through the press.

Their actions are not without risk.

One of the significant hurdles to developing local philanthropy, identified in a recent report, is the “cultural taboo against public philanthropy as it suggests ostentatious display of wealth. In Northern Ireland this is closely related to the history of the conflict and fearof ‘putting one’s head above the parapet’.”

In 2011, the Community Foundation NI hosted a ‘Philanthropy Week’ but found it difficult to persuade philanthropists to speak publicly. McKibbin however recognised the importance of doing so and also gave an interview to the Irish News about his family’s fund that supports children affected by illness or with special needs. His actions have inspired others to speak out about their own giving.

McKibbin’s fund, founded in memory of his parents in recognition of the positive upbringing they had provided, does not hold vast amounts of money, but allows the family to support four or five key projects each year, which he describes as “very rewarding, particularly when we see the results!”

Angila Chada, Chief Executive of Springboard, a young people’s peace-building charity in Belfast, also attended Philanthropy Week and was inspired to begin her own philanthropic journey. Chada was keen to illustrate that philanthropy isn’t exclusive to High Net Worth Individuals by setting up the Community Foundation’s first ever gradual growth endowment fund in January 2012 in honour of her parents who are able to share the joy of giving.

The Raj Darshna Foundation will support young people and the elderly in the community.

Chada describes its creation as the fulfilment of ‘a lifelong dream’. It became a reality after a visit to Auschwitz in 2009 when she was overwhelmed by a wish to give back. She feels she had an excellent upbringing and stable family home – but working in the community and voluntary sector, she knows that many local people have not been as fortunate.

As well as giving a portion of her wages each year she will be encouraging family and friends to invest for the benefit of others.
Chada has already given interviews to national and local press to explain why she feels it is important for others to consider how they could make a greater impact with their giving.